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EUROPEAN STANDARD
NORME EUROPÉENNE
EUROPÄISCHE NORM

EN 1996-1-2

May 2005

ICS 13.220.50; 91.010.30; 91.080.30

Incorporating corrigendum October 2010
Supersedes ENV 1996-1-2:1995

English version

Eurocode 6 - Design of masonry structures - Part 1-2: General rules - Structural fire design

Eurocode 6 - Calcul des ouvrages en maçonnerie - Partie 1-2: Règles générales - Calcul du comportement au feu Eurocode 6 - Bemessung und Konstruktion von Mauerwerksbauten - Teil 1-2: Allgemeine Regeln -Tragwerksbemessung für den Brandfall

This European Standard was approved by CEN on 4 November 2004.

CEN members are bound to comply with the CEN/CENELEC Internal Regulations which stipulate the conditions for giving this European Standard the status of a national standard without any alteration. Up-to-date lists and bibliographical references concerning such national standards may be obtained on application to the Central Secretariat or to any CEN member.

This European Standard exists in three official versions (English, French, German). A version in any other language made by translation under the responsibility of a CEN member into its own language and notified to the Central Secretariat has the same status as the official versions.

CEN members are the national standards bodies of Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and United Kingdom.

Image

Management Centre: Avenue Marnix 17, B-1000 Brussels

© 2010 CEN All rights of exploitation in any form and by any means reserved worldwide for CEN national Members.

Ref. No. EN 1996-1-2:2005: E

1

Contents

Page
Foreword 4
  Background of the Eurocode programme 4
  Status and field of application of Eurocodes 5
  National Standards implementing Eurocodes 6
  Links between Eurocodes and products harmonised technical specifications (ENs and ETAs) 6
  Additional information specific to EN 1996-1-2 7
  National Annex for EN 1996-1-2 9
Section 1. General 9
  1.1 Scope 9
  1.2 Normative references 10
  1.3 Assumptions 11
  1.4 Distinction between Principles and application Rules 11
  1.5 Definitions 11
    1.5.1 Special terms relating to fire design in general 12
    1.5.2 Special terms relating to calculation methods 13
  1.6 Symbols 13
Section 2. Basic principles and rules 15
  2.1 Performance requirement 15
    2.1.1 General 15
    2.1.2 Nominal fire exposure 15
    2.1.3 Parametric fire exposure 16
  2.2 Actions 16
  2.3 Design values of material properties 16
  2.4 Assessment methods 17
    2.4.1 General 17
    2.4.2 Member analysis 18
    2.4.3 Analysis of part of the structure 20 2
    2.4.4 Global structural analysis 20
Section 3. Materials 20
  3.1 Units 20
  3.2 Mortar 20
  3.3 Mechanical properties of masonry 20
    3.3.1 Mechanical properties of masonry at normal temperature 20
    3.3.2 Strength and deformation properties of masonry at elevated temperature 21
      3.3.2.1 General 21
      3.3.2.2 Unit mass 21
    3.3.3 Thermal properties 21
      3.3.3.1 Thermal elongation 21
      3.3.3.2 Specific heat capacity 21
      3.3.3.3 Thermal conductivity 21
Section 4. Design Procedures for obtaining fire resistance of masonry walls 21
  4.1 General information on the design of walls 21
    4.1.1 Wall types by function 21
    4.1.2 Cavity walls and untied walls comprising independent leaves 22
  4.2 Surface finishes – rendering mortar and plaster 24
  4.3 Additional requirements for masonry walls 24
  4.4 Assessment by testing 24
  4.5 Assessment by tabulated data 25
  4.6 Assessment by calculation 25
Section 5. Detailing 25
  5.1 General 25
  5.2 Junctions and joints 26
  5.3 Fixtures, pipes and cables 26
Annex A (Informative) Guidance on selection of fire resistance periods 28
Annex B (Normative) Tabulated fire resistance of masonry walls 29
Annex C (Informative) Simplified calculation model 63
Annex D (Informative) Advanced calculation method 72
Annex E (Informative) Examples of connections that meet the requirements of Section 5 80
3

Foreword

This document (EN 1996-1-2:2005) has been prepared by Technical Committee CEN/TC 250 “Structural Eurocodes”, the secretariat of which is held by BSI.

This European Standard shall be given the status of a national standard, either by publication of an identical text or by endorsement, at the latest by November 2005 and conflicting national standards shall be withdrawn at the latest by March 2010.

This document supersedes ENV 1996-1-2:1995.

CEN/TC 250 is responsible for all Structural Eurocodes.

Background of the Eurocode programme

In 1975, the Commission of the European Community decided on an action programme in the field of construction, based on article 95 of the Treaty. The objective of the programme was the elimination of technical obstacles to trade and the harmonisation of technical specifications.

Within this action programme, the Commission took the initiative to establish a set of harmonised technical rules for the design of construction works which, in a first stage, would serve as an alternative to the national rules in force in the Member States and, ultimately, would replace them.

For fifteen years, the Commission, with the help of a Steering Committee with Representatives of Member States, conducted the development of the Eurocodes programme, which led to the first generation of European codes in the 1980’s.

In 1989, the Commission and the Member States of the EU and EFTA decided, on the basis of an agreement1 between the Commission and CEN, to transfer the preparation and the publication of the Eurocodes to the CEN through a series of Mandates, in order to provide them with a future status of European Standard (EN). This links de facto the Eurocodes with the provisions of all the Council’s Directives and/or Commission’s Decisions dealing with European standards (e.g. the Council Directive 89/106/EEC on construction products - CPD -and Council Directives 93/37/EEC, 92/50/EEC and 89/440/EEC on public works and services and equivalent EFTA Directives initiated in pursuit of setting up the internal market).

1 Agreement between the Commission of the European Communities and the European Committee for Standardisation (CEN) concerning the work on EUROCODES for the design of building and civil engineering works (BC/CEN/03/89).

The Structural Eurocode programme comprises the following standards generally consisting of a number of Parts:

EN 1990 Eurocode : Basis of Structural Design
EN 1991 Eurocode 1: Actions on structures
EN 1992 Eurocode 2: Design of concrete structures
EN 1993 Eurocode 3: Design of steel structures
EN 1994 Eurocode 4: Design of composite steel and concrete structures 4
EN 1995 Eurocode 5: Design of timber structures
EN 1996 Eurocode 6: Design of masonry structures
EN 1997 Eurocode 7: Geotechnical design
EN 1998 Eurocode 8: Design of structures for earthquake resistance
EN 1999 Eurocode 9: Design of aluminium structures

Eurocode standards recognise the responsibility of regulatory authorities in each Member State and have safeguarded their right to determine values related to regulatory safety matters at national level where these continue to vary from State to State.

Status and field of application of Eurocodes

The Member States of the EU and EFTA recognise that EUROCODES serve as reference documents for the following purposes:

The Eurocodes, as far as they concern the construction works themselves, have a direct relationship with the Interpretative Documents2 referred to in Article 12 of the CPD, although they are of a different nature from harmonised product standards3. Therefore, technical aspects arising from the Eurocodes work need to be adequately considered by CEN Technical Committees and/or EOTA Working Groups working on product standards with a view to achieving full compatibility of these technical specifications with the Eurocodes.

The Eurocode standards provide common structural design rules for everyday use for the design of whole structures and component products of both a traditional and an innovative nature. Unusual forms of construction or design conditions are not specifically covered and additional expert consideration will be required by the designer in such cases.

2 According to Art. 3.3 of the CPD, the essential requirements (ERs) shall be given concrete form in interpretative documents for the creation of the necessary links between the essential requirements and the mandates for harmonised ENs and ETAGs/ETAs.

3 According to Art. 12 of the CPD the interpretative documents shall :

  1. give concrete form to the essential requirements by harmonising the terminology and the technical bases and indicating classes or levels for each requirement where necessary ;
  2. indicate methods of correlating these classes or levels of requirement with the technical specifications, e.g. methods of calculation and of proof, technical rules for project design, etc. ;
  3. serve as a reference for the establishment of harmonised standards and guidelines for European technical approvals.

    The Eurocodes, de facto, play a similar role in the field of the ER 1 and a part of ER 2.

5

National Standards implementing Eurocodes

The National Standards implementing Eurocodes will comprise the full text of the Eurocode (including any annexes), as published by CEN, which may be preceded by a National title page and National foreword, and may be followed by a National Annex.

The National Annex may only contain information on those parameters which are left open in the Eurocode for national choice, known as Nationally Determined Parameters, to be used for the design of buildings and civil engineering works to be constructed in the country concerned, i.e. :

and it may also contain

Links between Eurocodes and products harmonised technical specifications (ENs and ETAs)

There is a need for consistency between the harmonised technical specifications for construction products and the technical rules for works4. Furthermore, all the information accompanying the CE Marking of the construction products which refer to Eurocodes should clearly mention which Nationally Determined Parameters have been taken into account.

This European Standard is part of EN 1996 which comprises the following parts:

Image EN 1996-1-1: General rules for reinforced and unreinforced masonry structures Image

EN 1996-1-2: General Rules - Structural Fire Design.

EN 1996-2: Design, Selection of materials and execution of masonry

Image EN 1996-3: Simplified calculation methods for unreinforced masonry structures Image

EN 1996-1-2 is intended to be used together with EN 1990, EN 1991-1-2, EN 1996-1-1, EN 1996-2 and EN 1996-3

4 see Art.3.3 and Art. 12 of the CPD, as well as clauses 4.2, 4.3.1, 4.3.2 and 5.2 of ID 1.

6

Additional information specific to EN 1996-1-2

The general objectives of fire protection are to limit risks with respect to the individual and society, neighbouring property, and where required, directly exposed property, in the case of fire.

The Construction Products Directive 89/106/EEC gives the following essential requirement for the limitation of fire risks:

“The construction works must be designed and built in such a way that, in the event of an outbreak of fire

According to the Interpretative Document No 2 “Safety in Case of Fire” the essential requirement may be observed by following various possibilities for fire safety strategies prevailing in the Member States like conventional fire scenarios (nominal fires) or ‘natural’ (parametric) fire scenarios, including passive and/or active fire protection measures.

The fire parts of Structural Eurocodes deal with specific aspects of passive fire protection in terms of designing structures and parts thereof for adequate load bearing resistance that could be needed for safe evacuation of occupants and fire rescue operations and for limiting fire spread as relevant.

Required functions and levels of performance are generally specified by the national authorities - mostly in terms of a standard fire resistance rating. Where fire safety engineering for assessing passive and active measures is acceptable, requirements by authorities will be less prescriptive and may allow for alternative strategies.

This Part 1-2, together with EN 1991-1-2, Actions on structures exposed to fire, supplements EN 1996-1-1, so that the design of masonry structures can comply with normal and fire requirements.

Supplementary requirements concerning, for example

are not given in this document, as they are subject to specification by the competent authority.

7

A full analytical procedure for structural fire design would take into account the behaviour of the structural system at elevated temperatures, the potential heat exposure and the beneficial effects of active fire protection systems, together with the uncertainties associated with these three features and the importance of the structure (consequences of failure).

At the present time it is possible to perform a calculation procedure for determining adequate performance which incorporates some, if not all, of these parameters and to demonstrate that the structure, or its components, will give adequate performance in a real building fire. However the principal current procedure in European countries is one based on results from standard fire resistance tests. The grading system in regulations, which call for specific periods of fire resistance, takes into account (though not explicitly), the features and uncertainties described above.

Due to the limitations of the test method, further tests or analyses may be used. Nevertheless, the results of standard fire tests form the bulk of input for calculation procedures for structural fire design. This standard therefore deals principally with the design for the standard fire resistance.

Application of this Part 1-2 of Eurocode 6 with the thermal actions given in EN 1991-1-2, is illustrated in figure 0.1. For design according to this part, EN 1991-1-2 is required for the determination of temperature fields in structural elements, or when using general calculation models for the analysis of the structural response.

Figure 0.1 : Design procedures

Figure 0.1 : Design procedures

8

Where simple calculation models are not available, the Eurocode fire parts give design solutions in terms of tabular data (based on tests or general calculation models), which may be used within the specified limits of validity.

National Annex for EN 1996-1-2

This standard gives alternative procedures, values and recommendations for classes, with notes indicating where national choices may have to be made. Therefore the National Standard implementing EN 1996-1-2 should include a National annex which contains all Nationally Determined Parameters to be used for the design of buildings and civil engineering works constructed in the relevant country.

National choice is allowed in EN 1996-1-2 through clauses:

Image - 2.1.3(2) Parametric fire exposure;
- 2.2(2) Actions;
- 2.3(2)P Design values of material properties;
Text deleted
- 3.3.3.1(1) Thermal elongation;
- 3.3.3.2(1) Specific heat;
- 3.3.3.3(1) Thermal conductivity;
- 4.5(3) Value of γGlo;
- Annex B Tabulated values of fire resistance of masonry walls;
- Annex C Values of constant c. Image

Section 1. General

1.1 Scope

  1. P This Part 1-2 of EN 1996 deals with the design of masonry structures for the accidental situation of fire exposure, and is intended to be used in conjunction with EN 1996-1-1, EN 1996-2, 1996-3 and EN 1991-1-2. This part 1-2 only identifies differences from, or supplements to, normal temperature design.
  2. P This Part 1 -2 deals only with passive methods of fire protection. Active methods are not covered.
  3. P This Part 1-2 applies to masonry structures which, for reasons of general fire safety, are required to fulfil certain functions when exposed to fire, in terms of: 9
  4. P This Part 1-2 gives principles and application rules for designing structures for specified requirements in respect of the aforementioned functions and levels of performance.
  5. P This Part 1-2 applies to structures, or parts of structures, that are within the scope of EN 1996-1-1, EN 1996-2 and EN 1996-3 and are designed accordingly.
  6. P This Part 1-2 does not cover masonry built with Natural Stone units to EN771-6
  7. P This Part 1-2 deals with the following:

1.2 Normative references

This European standard incorporates by dated or undated references, provisions from other publications. These Normative references are cited at appropriate places in the text and the publications are listed hereafter. For dated references, subsequent amendments to, or revisions of, any of these publications apply to this European Standard only when incorporated in it by amendment or revision. For undated references, the latest edition of the publication referred to applies (including amendments).

EN 771-1 Specification for masonry units - Part 1: Clay masonry units.
EN 771-2 Specification for masonry units - Part 2: Calcium silicate masonry units
EN 771-3 Specification for masonry units - Part 3: Aggregate concrete masonry units (dense and light-weight aggregates)
EN 771-4 Specification for masonry units - Part 4: Autoclaved aerated concrete masonry units
EN 771-5 Specification for masonry units - Part 5: Manufactured stone masonry units
EN 771-6 Specification for masonry units - Part 6 : Natural stone units
EN 772-13 Methods of test for masonry units - Part 13: Determination of net and gross dry density of masonry units (except for natural stone)
EN 998-1 Specification for mortar for masonry - Part 1: Rendering and plastering mortar
EN 998-2 Specification for mortar for masonry - Part 2: Masonry mortar.
EN 1363 Fire resistance
Part 1: General requirements
Part 2: Alternative and additional requirements 10
EN 1364 Fire resistance tests of non-loadbearing elements.
Part 1 Walls
EN 1365 Fire resistance tests of loadbearing elements.
Part 1 Walls
EN 1365 Fire resistance tests of loadbearing elements.
Part 4 Columns
EN 1366 Fire resistance tests for service installations.
Part 3 Penetration seals
EN 1990 Basis of design for Structural Eurocodes
EN 1991 Basis of design and actions on structures:
Part 1-1: General actions - Densities, self-weight, imposed loads for buildings
Part 1-2: Actions on structures exposed to fire;
Image EN 1996 Design of masonry structures:
Part 1-1: General rules for reinforced and unreinforced masonry structures
Part 2: Design considerations, selection of materials and execution of masonry
Part 3: Simplified calculation methods for unreinforced masonry structures Image
prEN 12602 Prefabricated reinforced components of autoclaved aerated concrete
Annex C – Resistance to fire design of AAC components and structures
EN 13279-1 Gypsum and gypsum-based building plaster - Part 1: Definitions and requirements

1.3 Assumptions

  1. P In addition to the general assumptions of EN 1990 the following assumptions apply:

1.4 Distinction between Principles and application Rules

  1. The rules given in EN 1990 clause 1.4 apply.

1.5 Definitions

For the purposes of this Part 1-2 of EN 1996, the definitions of EN 1990 and of EN 1991-1-2 apply with the following additional definitions:

11

1.5.1 Special terms relating to fire design in general

1.5.1.1
Fire protection material

Any material or combination of materials applied to a structural member for the purpose of increasing its fire resistance

1.5.1.2
Fire wall

A wall separating two spaces (generally two fire compartments or buildings) which is designed for fire resistance and structural stability, including resistance to mechanical impact (Criterion M) such that, in the case of fire and failure of the structure on one side of the wall, fire spread beyond the wall is avoided (so that a Fire wall is designated REI-M or EI-M)

NOTE: In some countries a fire wall has been defined as a separating wall between fire compartments without a requirement for resistance to mechanical impact; the definition above should not be confused with this more limited one. Fire walls may have to fulfil additional requirements not given in this part 1-2, these being given in the regulations of each country

1.5.1.3
Loadbearing wall

A flat, membrane-like component predominantly subjected to compressive stress, for supporting vertical loads, for example floor loads, and also for supporting horizontal loads, for example wind loads.

1.5.1.4
Non-loadbearing wall

A flat membrane-like building component loaded predominantly only by its dead weight, and which does not provide bracing for loadbearing walls. It may however, be required to transfer horizontal loads acting on its surface to loadbearing building components such as walls or floors.

1.5.1.5
Separating wall

A wall exposed to fire on one side only.

1.5.1.6
Non-separating wall

A loadbearing wall exposed to fire on two or more sides.

1.5.1.7
Normal temperature design

The ultimate limit state design for ambient temperatures in accordance with Part 1-1 of EN 1992 to 1996 or ENV 1999

1.5.1.8
Part of structure

The isolated part of an entire structure with appropriate support and boundary conditions.

12

1.5.2 Special terms relating to calculation methods

1.5.2.1
Ineffective cross section

The area of a cross section that is assumed to become ineffective for fire resistance purposes.

1.5.2.2.
Effective cross section

The cross section of a member used in structural fire design, obtained by removing parts of the cross section with assumed zero strength and stiffness.

1.5.2.3.
Residual cross section

That part of the cross section of the original member which is assumed to remain after deduction of the thickness which is ineffective for fire-resistance purposes.

1.5.2.4
Structural failure of a wall in the fire situation

When the wall loses its ability to carry a specified load after a certain period of time

1.5.2.5
Maximum stress level

For a given temperature, the stress level at which the stress-strain relationship of masonry is truncated to a yield plateau.

1.6 Symbols

For the purpose of this Part 1-2, the following symbols apply, in addition to those given in Image EN 1996-1-1 Image and EN 1991-1-2:

E 30 or E 60,. . ., member meeting the integrity criterion, E, for 30, or 60 .. minutes in standard fire exposure.

I 30 or I 60,. . ., member meeting the thermal insulation criterion, I, for 30, or 60 .. minutes in standard fire exposure.

M 90 or M 120,. . ., member meeting the mechanical resistance criterion, M, for 90, or 120 .. minutes after standard fire exposure when mechanical impact applied.

R 30 or R 60,. . ., member meeting the load bearing criterion, R, for 30, or 60 .. minutes in standard fire exposure,

A total area of masonry
Am surface area of a member per unit length;
Ap area of the inner surface of the fire protection material per unit length of the member;
Aθ1 area of masonry up to temperature θ1;
Aθ2 area of masonry between temperatures θ1 and θ2; 13
c constant obtained from stress strain tests at elevated temperature (with subscripts)
ca specific heat capacity of masonry;
ct combined thickness of webs and shells (given as a percentage of the width of a unit)
eΔθ eccentricity due to variation of temperature across masonry;

Image Text deleted Image

f1 design compressive strength of masonry at less than or equal to θ1;
f2 design strength of masonry in compression between θ1 and θ2°C

Image Text deleted Image

l length at 20°C ;
lF length of a wall for a period of fire resistance
NEd design value of the vertical load;
NRd,fiθ2 design value of the resistance in fire;
NRk characteristic value of vertical resistance of masonry wall or column;
nvg no value given
tF thickness of a wall for a period of fire resistance
tfi,d time of fire classification (eg 30 minutes) for a standard fire in accordance with EN 1363;
tFr thickness of the cross-section whose temperature does not exceed θ2
Image α the ratio of the applied design load on the wall to the design resistance of the wall; Image
αt coefficient of thermal expansion of masonry
εT thermal strain
γGlo a safety factor for use in fire tests;
Δt time interval;
Image ΔΘ1 average temperature rise of the unexposed side; Image
Image ΔΘ2 maximum temperature rise of the unexposed side at any point; Image
ηfi reduction factor for design load level in the fire situation;
θ1 temperature up to which the cold strength of masonry may be used;
θ2 temperature above which any residual masonry strength is ignored;
λa thermal conductivity; 14
μ0 degree of utilisation at time t = 0.
ρ gross dry density of the masonry units, measured in accordance with EN 772- 13.

Section 2. Basic principles and rules

2.1 Performance requirement

2.1.1 General

  1. P Where mechanical resistance is required, structures shall be designed and constructed in such a way that they maintain their loadbearing function during the relevant fire exposure.
  2. P Where compartmentation is required, the elements forming the boundaries of the fire compartment, including joints, shall be designed and constructed in such a way that they maintain their separating function during the relevant fire exposure, i.e.
  3. P Deformation criteria shall be applied where the means of protection, or the design criteria for separating elements, requires consideration of the deformation of the load bearing structure.
  4. Consideration of the deformation of the load bearing structure is not necessary in the following case:

2.1.2 Nominal fire exposure

  1. P For the standard fire exposure, members shall comply with criteria, R (mechanical resistance). E (integrity), I (insulation) and M (mechanical impact) as follows:
    - Loadbearing only criterion R
    - Separating only criteria EI
    - Separating and loadbearing criteria REI
    - Loadbearing, separating and mechanical impact criteria REI-M
    - Separating and mechanical impact criteria EI-M
    15
  2. Criterion R is assumed to be satisfied when the load bearing function is maintained throughout the required time of fire exposure.
  3. Criterion I is assumed to be satisfied when the mean temperature of the unexposed face does not rise by more Image 140 K Image, and the maximum temperature rise at any point of that surface does not exceed Image 180 K Image
  4. Criterion E is assumed to be satisfied when the passage of flames and hot gases through the member is prevented.
  5. Where a vertical separating element, with or without a load-bearing function, is required to comply with an impact resistance requirement, (criterion M), the element should resist the application of the horizontal concentrated load specified in EN 1363 Part 2.
  6. With the external fire exposure curve the same criteria as (1)P should apply, however the reference to this specific curve should be identified by the letters “ef”.

2.1.3 Parametric fire exposure

  1. The load-bearing function is satisfied when collapse is prevented for the complete duration of the fire, including the decay phase, or for a prescribed period of time.
  2. The separating function, with respect to insulation, is satisfied when the following criteria are met:

    Image NOTE: The recommended values for maximum temperature rise during the decay phase are ΔΘ1 = 200 K and ΔΘ1 = 240 K. The choice to be made at the national level may be given in the National Annex. Image

2.2 Actions

  1. P The thermal and mechanical actions shall be obtained from EN 1991-1-2.
  2. The emissivity of a masonry surface should be taken as εm.

    NOTE: The value to be ascribed to εm in a Country may be found in its National Annex. The value will depend on the material of the masonry.

2.3 Design values of material properties

  1. P Design values of the mechanical (material strength and deformation) properties, Xd,fi, are defined as follows:

    Xd,fi = kθ Xk / γM,fi      (2.1)

    where:

    Xk is the characteristic value of the strength or deformation property of the material (eg fk) for normal temperature design to EN 1996-1-1; 16
    kθ is the reduction factor for the strength or deformation property (Xk,θ / Xk), dependent on the material temperature;
    γM,fi is the partial safety factor for the relevant material property, for the fire situation.
  2. P Design values of the thermal properties, Xd,fi, of materials are defined as follows:
    1. if an increase of the property is favourable for safety:

      Xd,fi = Xk,θ / γM,fi      (2.2a)

      or

    2. if an increase of the property is unfavourable for safety:

      Xd,fi = γM,fi Xk,θ      (2.2b)

      where:

      Xk,θ is the value of the material property in fire design, generally dependent on the material temperature, (see section 3);

    NOTE: The value of γM,fi to be ascribed in a Country may be found in its National Annex. For thermal properties of masonry the recommended value of the partial safety factor γM,fi for the fire situation is 1,0. For mechanical properties of masonry, the recommended value of the partial safety factor γM,fi for the fire situation is 1,0.

2.4 Assessment methods

2.4.1 General

  1. P The model of the structural system adopted for design in the fire situation shall reflect the expected performance of the structure in fire.
  2. P The analysis for the fire situation may be carried out using one of the following:
  3. P It shall be verified for the relevant duration of fire exposure that

    Efi,dRfi,t,d     (2.3)

    Where

    Efi,d is the design effect of actions for the fire situation, determined in accordance with EN 1991-1-2, including the effects of thermal expansion and deformation
    Rfi,t,d is the corresponding design resistance in the fire situation.
    17
  4. The structural analysis for the normal situation should be carried out in accordance with EN 1990 5.1.4(2).
  5. In order to verify standard fire resistance requirements, a member analysis is sufficient.
  6. Where application rules given in this Part 1-2 are only valid for the standard temperature-time curve, this is identified in the relevant clauses
  7. P Tabulated data given in this part is based on the standard temperature-time curve in accordance with EN 1363.
  8. P As an alternative to design by calculation, fire resistance may be based on the results of fire tests, or on fire tests in combination with calculation (see EN 1990 5.2).

2.4.2 Member analysis

  1. The effect of actions should be determined for time Image t = 0 Image using combination factors ψ1,1 or ψ2,1 according to EN 1991-1-2.
  2. As a simplification to (1), the effect of ψ2,1 on actions Ed,fi may be obtained from a structural analysis for normal temperature design as:

    Ed,fi = ηfi Ed      (2.4)

    where:

    Ed is the design value of the corresponding force or moment for normal temperature design, for a fundamental combination of actions (see EN 1990);
    ηfi is the reduction factor for the design load level for the fire situation.
  3. The reduction factor ηfi for load combination (6.10) in EN 1990 should be taken as:

    Image

    or for load combinations (6.10a) and (6.10b) in EN 1990 as the smaller value given by the two following expressions:

    Image

    Image

    where:

    Qk,1 is the principal variable load;
    Gk is the characteristic value of a permanent action; 18
    γG is the partial factor for permanent actions;
    γQ,1 is the partial factor for variable action 1;
    ψfi is the combination factor for frequent values, given either by ψ1,1 or ψ2,1
    ξ is a reduction factor for unfavourable permanent actions G.

    NOTE 1: An example of the variation of the reduction factor ηfi versus the load ratio Qk,1 /Gk for different values of the combination factor ψfi = ψ1,1 according to expression (2.5) is shown in the figure to this note with the following assumptions: γGA = 1,0, γG = 1,35 and γQ = 1,5. Use of expressions (2.5a) and (2.5b) will give figures slightly higher than those in the figure.

    Image The values of partial factors for use in a Country may be found in its National Annex for EN 1990. Recommended values are given in EN 1990. The choice of expression (6.10) or (6.10)a and (6.10)b may also be found in the National Annex for EN 1990. Image

    Variation of the reduction factor nfi with the load ratio Qk,1/Gk

    Variation of the reduction factor ηfi with the load ratio Qk,1 / Gk

    NOTE 2: As a simplification the recommended value of ηfi = 0,65 may be used, except for imposed load category E as given in EN 1990 (areas for storage and industrial activity) for which the recommended value is 0,7.

  4. Only the effects of thermal deformations resulting from thermal gradients across the cross-section need to be considered. The effects of axial or in-plane thermal expansions may be neglected.
  5. The boundary conditions at supports and ends of a member may be assumed to remain unchanged throughout the fire exposure.
  6. Tabulated data, simplified or advanced calculation methods are suitable for verifying members under fire conditions.

    NOTE: Annexes B, C and D give information on tabulated data, simplified and advanced calculation methods.

19

2.4.3 Analysis of part of the structure

  1. The effect of actions should be determined for time t=0 using combination factors ψ1,1 or ψ2,1 according to EN 1991-1-2.
  2. As an alternative to carrying out a structural analysis for the fire situation at time t = 0, the reactions at supports and internal forces and moments at boundaries of part of the structure may be obtained from a structural analysis for normal temperature as given in 2.4.1(4)
  3. The part of the structure to be analysed should be specified on the basis of the potential thermal expansions and deformations, such that their interaction with other parts of the structure can be approximated by time-independent support and boundary conditions during fire exposure.
  4. P Within the part of the structure to be analysed, the relevant failure mode in fire exposure, the temperature-dependent material properties and member stiffnesses, effects of thermal expansions and deformations (indirect fire actions) shall be taken into account
  5. The boundary conditions at supports and forces and moments at boundaries of part of the structure may be assumed to remain unchanged throughout the fire exposure.

2.4.4 Global structural analysis

  1. P When global structural analysis for the fire situation is carried out, the relevant failure mode in fire exposure, the temperature-dependent material properties and member stiffness, effects of thermal expansions and deformations (indirect fire actions) shall be taken into account.

Section 3. Materials

3.1 Units

  1. The requirements for masonry units given in EN 1996-1-1 apply to this Part with the following addition:

3.2 Mortar

  1. The requirements for mortar given in EN 1996-1-1 apply to this Part.

3.3 Mechanical properties of masonry

3.3.1 Mechanical properties of masonry at normal temperature

  1. P The mechanical properties of masonry at 20°C shall be taken as those given in EN 1996-1-1 for normal temperature design.
20

3.3.2 Strength and deformation properties of masonry at elevated temperature

3.3.2.1 General
  1. The strength and deformation properties of masonry at elevated temperatures may be obtained from the stress-strain relationship obtained by tests for a project or from a database.

    NOTE: Stress-strain relationships for some materials are given in Annex D. These sress strain relationships are valid for heating rates between 2 and 50 K/min.

3.3.2.2 Unit mass
  1. The unit mass of masonry may be considered to be independent of the masonry temperature. The density of masonry can be obtained from the density of the masonry materials, as given in EN 1991-1-1.

    NOTE: The density of masonry units and mortar should be declared by the manufacturer in accordance with ENs 771-1 to 5 and EN 998-2.

3.3.3 Thermal properties

3.3.3.1 Thermal elongation
  1. The thermal elongation of masonry should be determined from tests or from a database.

    NOTE: The variation of the thermal elongation with temperature for some materials is given in Annex D; values may be found in the National Annex.

3.3.3.2 Specific heat capacity
  1. The specific heat capacity of masonry, ca, should be determined from tests or from a database.

    NOTE 1: The variation of the specific heat capacity with temperature for some materials is given in Annex D

    NOTE 2: The value of ca to be used in a Country may be found in its National Annex.

3.3.3.3 Thermal conductivity
  1. The thermal conductivity, λa, should be determined from tests or from a database.

    NOTE 1: The variation of the thermal conductivity with temperature for some materials is given in Annex D

    NOTE 2: The value of λa to be used in a Country may be found in its National Annex.

Section 4. Design Procedures for obtaining fire resistance of masonry walls

4.1 General information on the design of walls

4.1.1 Wall types by function

  1. For fire protection, a distinction is made between non-loadbearing walls and loadbearing walls, and between separating walls and non-separating walls. 21
  2. Separating walls serve to prevent fire propagation from one place to another, and are exposed to fire on one side only. Examples are walls along escape ways, walls of stair wells, separating walls of a fire compartment.
  3. Non-separating loadbearing walls are subjected to fire on two or more sides. Examples are walls within a fire compartment.
  4. External walls may be separating walls, or non-separating walls as required.

    NOTE: External separating walls less than 1,0 m in length should be treated as non-separating walls for the purposes of fire design, depending on the adjacent construction.

  5. Walls which include lintels above openings should have at least the same fire resistance as if there was no lintel in the wall.
  6. Fire walls are separating walls that are required to resist mechanical impact in addition to actions REI, or EI, as relevant.

    NOTE: Examples of fire walls are walls separating buildings or fire compartments.

  7. Stiffening elements, such as cross walls, floors, beams, columns or frames, should have at least the same fire resistance as the wall.

    NOTE: If assessment shows that the failure of the stiffening elements on one side of a fire wall would not lead to a failure of the fire wall the stiffening elements do not need fire resistance.

  8. Additional factors to be considered for fire design are:

4.1.2 Cavity walls and untied walls comprising independent leaves

  1. When both leaves of a cavity wall are loadbearing and carry approximately equal loads, the fire resistance of a cavity wall with leaves of approximately equal thickness is defined as the fire resistance of an equivalent single leaf wall of thickness equal to the sum of the thicknesses of the two leaves, (see figure 4.1, A), providing that no combustible material is included in the cavity. 22

    Figure 4.1: Illustration of cavity walls and double leaf walls

    Figure 4.1: Illustration of cavity walls and double leaf walls

  2. When only one leaf of a cavity wall is loadbearing, the resistance of the cavity wall is usually greater than the fire resistance achieved for the loadbearing leaf when considered to act as a single leaf wall, (see figure 4.1, B).
  3. The fire resistance of a cavity wall comprising two non-loadbearing leaves (Figure 4.1, C) may be taken as the sum of the fire resistances of the individual leaves, limited to a maximum of 240 min when fire resistance is determined by this Part of EN 1996-1-2. 23
  4. For untied walls comprising independent leaves, the fire resistance of the wall is determined by reference to the appropriate loadbearing or non-loadbearing table in Annex B for the single leaf wall (see figure 4.1, D) which is to be assessed as being exposed to fire.

4.2 Surface finishes

  1. The fire resistance of masonry walls may be increased by the application of a layer of a suitable surface finish, for example:

    For cavity and untied walls, the surface finish is only needed on the outside faces of the leaves, and not between the two leaves.

  2. An additional masonry leaf or masonry cladding may be used to increase the fire resistance of a wall.

4.3 Additional requirements for masonry walls

  1. P Any supporting, or stiffening, part of a structure shall have at least the same fire resistance as the structure being supported.
  2. Combustible thin damp proof materials incorporated into a wall may be ignored in assessing fire resistance.
  3. Masonry units containing holes through the unit should not be laid so that the holes are at right angles to the face of the wall, i.e. the wall should not be penetrated by the holes of the masonry units.
  4. When thermal insulation systems made of insulation and plaster are used on single leaf external walls, it should be noted that:

4.4 Assessment by testing

  1. For all types of masonry walls the fire resistance may be obtained from tests made in accordance with the relevant ENs (see 1.2 for a list of test methods). Guidance on selection of fire resistance periods is given in Annex A.
  2. Tests on masonry walls should be carried out if the fire resistance of the masonry to be used (masonry units, percentage of holes, density, dimension), type of mortar (general purpose mortar, lightweight or thin layer mortar) or the combination of units and mortar is not available already.

    NOTE: Values of fire resistance may be available in a database.

24

4.5 Assessment by tabulated data

  1. Assessment of masonry walls may be carried out using Image Tables B.1 to B.6 in Annex B, Image which give the minimum thickness of masonry required, for the relevant criterion, to achieve the stated period of fire resistance, when constructed using units of the material, Group and density given.
  2. In the tables, the minimum wall thickness given is for fire resistance purposes only. The thickness required for other considerations as defined in EN 1996-1-1, or which is needed to meet other requirements, for example acoustic performance, is not taken into account.
  3. The tabulated values for loadbearing walls are valid for a total characteristic vertical load of (α NRk)/γGlo where α, the ratio of the applied design load on the wall to the design resistance of the wall, is 1,0 or 0,6 and where NRk is taken as Φfkt (see EN 1996-1-1).

    NOTE: The value γGlo to be used in a Country may be found in its National Annex. The tables in the NOTE to Annex B have been obtained from the consideration of test results wherein γGlo was 3 to 5; fire tests, before the advent of partial factor design, were subjected to the permissible load, which was, approximately, the characteristic strength divided by the global factor γF × γM, where γF and γM are partial factors for actions and materials respectively (see EN 1990 and EN 1996-1-1).

4.6 Assessment by calculation

  1. The fire resistance of masonry walls may be assessed by calculation, taking into account the relevant failure mode in fire exposure, the temperature dependent material properties, the slenderness ratio and the effects of thermal expansions and deformations.
  2. The calculation method may be:
  3. The validity of calculation methods should be assessed by comparison of calculated fire resistance with the results of tests.

    NOTE 1: A simplified method of calculation for walls is given in Annex C.

    NOTE 2: An advanced method of calculation for walls is given in Annex D.

Section 5. Detailing

5.1 General

  1. P The detailing of masonry in a structure shall not reduce the fire resistance of the construction.
25

5.2 Junctions and joints

  1. P Floors or the roof shall provide lateral support to the top and bottom of the wall, unless stability under normal conditions is provided by other means, for example buttresses or special ties.
  2. P Joints, including movement joints, in walls, or between walls and other fire separating members, shall be designed and constructed so as to achieve the fire resistance requirement of the walls.
  3. P Where fire insulating layers are required in movement joints, they shall consist of mineral based materials having a melting point of not less than 1000°C. Any joints shall be tightly sealed so that movement of the wall shall not adversely affect the fire resistance. If other materials are to be used, it shall be shown by test that they meet criteria E and I (see EN 1366: Part 4).
  4. Connections between non-loadbearing masonry walls should be built according to EN 1996-2 or to other suitable details.

    NOTE: Examples of suitable details are given in Annex E.

  5. Connections of loadbearing masonry walls may be built according to EN 1996-1-1 or to other suitable details.

    NOTE: Examples of suitable details are given in Annex E.

  6. Connection of fire walls to reinforced, unreinforced concrete and masonry structures which are required to fulfil mechanical requirements (i.e. connections which are required to fulfil the mechanical impact requirements in accordance with EN 1363-2) should be constructed with joints that are filled completely with mortar or concrete or they should be constructed with properly protected mechanical fixings. Where connections are not required to provide mechanical resistance they may be built in accordance with (4) or (5) as appropriate.

5.3 Fixtures, pipes and cables

  1. The presence of recesses and chases, as permitted by EN 1996-1-1 in loadbearing walls without the need for separate calculation, can be assumed not to reduce the period of fire resistance given in the tables referred to in 4.5.
  2. For non-loadbearing walls, vertical chases and recesses should leave at least 2/3 of the required minimum thickness of the wall, but not less than 60mm, including any integrally applied fire resistance finishes such as plaster.
  3. Horizontal and inclined chases and recesses in non-loadbearing walls should leave at least 5/6 of the required minimum thickness of the wall, but not less than 60 mm, including any integrally applied fire resistant finishes such as plaster. Horizontal and inclined chases and recesses should not be positioned within the middle one-third height of the wall. The width of individual chases and recesses in non-loadbearing walls should be not greater than twice the required minimum thickness of the wall, including any integrally applied fire resistant finishes such as plaster. 26
  4. The fire resistance of non-loadbearing walls having chases or recesses not complying with (2) and (3) should be evaluated from tests according to EN 1364.
  5. Individual cables may pass through holes sealed with mortar. Additionally, non-combustible pipes up to 100 mm diameter may pass through non combustibly sealed holes, if the effects of heat conduction through the pipes do not infringe the criteria E and I, and any expansion does not impair fire resistance performance.

    Image NOTE: Materials other than mortar may be used provided they conform to CEN Standards. Image

  6. Groups of cables and pipes of combustible materials, or individual cables in holes not sealed with mortar, may pass through walls if either:
27

Annex A
Guidance on selection of fire resistance periods

(Informative)

  1. The fire behaviour of a masonry wall depends on
  2. In arriving at values of fire resistance from consideration of test results, it is important to base the interpretation of any existing fire test results on the requirements for the relevant test method from EN 1363, EN 1364-1, EN 1365-1, EN 1365-4. In particular, allowance should be made for any difference from that required in the above mentioned test method in the loading system used in the fire test on loadbearing walls, for example fixed ends, free ends or one fixed end and one partly free end.
  3. In non-loadbearing walls, the restraint method will also influence the test results and it should be evaluated against the system in EN 1364-1.
28

Annex B
Tabulated fire resistance of masonry walls

(Normative)

  1. The thickness of a masonry wall, tF, to give a period of fire resistance tfi,d, may be taken from the tables B1, B2, B3, B4, B5 and B6 for the relevant wall and loading situation.
  2. The tables are valid only for walls complying with EN 1996-1-1, EN 1996-2 and EN 1996-3, as appropriate to the type of wall and its function (for example, non-loadbearing).
  3. In the tables the thickness referred to is that of the masonry itself, excluding finishes, if any. The first row of pairs of rows defines the resistance for walls without a suitable surface finish (see 4.2(1)). Values in brackets ( ) in the second row of pairs of rows are for walls having an applied finish in accordance with 4.2(1), of minimum thickness 10mm on both faces of a single leaf wall, or on the fire-exposed face of a cavity wall. Image Text deleted Image

    NOTE 1: A sand cement render does not normally increase the fire resistance of a masonry wall to the extent given in the second row of pairs of rows of the tables unless national experience indicates otherwise

    NOTE 2: pairs of rows are, for example 1.1.1 and 1.1.2 in table N.B.1

  4. Masonry made with units having high precision dimensions and having unfilled vertical joints more than 2 mm, but less than Image 5 mm Image, wide, may be assessed using the tables providing render or plaster of at least 1 mm thickness is used on at least one side. In such cases, the fire resistance periods are those given for walls without a layer of surface finish. For walls having vertical joints with a thickness less than or equal to 2 mm, no additional finish is required in order to be able to use the Tables appropriate to walls with no applied finish.
  5. Masonry made with tongued and grooved masonry units and having unfilled vertical joints less than 5 mm, wide, may be assessed using the tables appropriate to walls without a layer of surface finish.
Table B.1 Minimum thickness of non-loadbearing separating walls (Criteria EI) for fire resistance classifications
Material of wall Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification EI for time (minutes) tfi,d
15 20 30 45 60 90 120 180 240 360
Type of units, mortar, grouping of units, including combined thickness if required, and Image gross dry Image density Wall thickness tF
29
Table B.2 Minimum thickness of separating loadbearing single-leaf walls (Criteria REI) for fire resistance classifications
Material of wall Loading level Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification REI for time (minutes) tfi,d
15 20 30 45 60 90 120 180 240 360
Type of units, mortar, grouping of units, Image gross dry Image density Loading level α ≤ 1,0 and α ≤ 0,6 Wall thickness tF
Table B.3 Minimum thickness of non-separating loadbearing single-leaf walls ≥l,0m in length (Criterion R) for fire resistance classifications
Material of wall Loading level Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification R for time (minutes) tfi,d
15 20 30 45 60 90 120 180 240 360
Type of units, mortar, grouping of units, Image gross dry Image density Loading level α ≤ 1,0 and α ≤ 0,6 Wall thickness tF
Table B.4 Minimum length of non-separating loadbearing single-leaf walls <l,0m in length (Criterion R) for fire resistance classifications
Material of wall Loading level Minimum wall thickness (mm) Minimum wall length (mm) lF for fire resistance classification R for time (minutes) tfi,d
15 20 30 45 60 90 120 180 240 360
Type of units, mortar, grouping of units, Image gross dry Image density Loading level α ≤ 1,0 and α ≤ 0,6 tF Wall length lF
Table B.5 Minimum thickness of separating loadbearing and non-loadbearing single and double leaf fire walls (Criteria REI-M and EI-M) for fire resistance classifications
Material of wall Loading level Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification REI-M and EI-M for time (minutes) tfi,d
15 20 30 45 60 90 120 180 240 360
Type of units, mortar, grouping of units, Image gross dry Image density Loading level α ≤ 1,0 and α ≤ 0,6 Wall thickness tF
30
Table B.6 Minimum thickness of separating loadbearing cavity walls with one leaf loaded (Criteria REI) for fire resistance classifications
Material of wall Loading level Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification REI for time (minutes) tfi,d
15 20 30 45 60 90 120 180 240 360
Type of units, mortar, grouping of units. Image gross dry Image density Loading level α ≤ 1,0 and α ≤ 0,6 Wall thickness tF

NOTE 1: The periods of fire resistance, from 15 to 360 minutes, given in Table B.1 to B.6 cover the whole range given in the Commission Decision of 3rd May 2000 in the Official Journal L133/26 dated 6.6.2000. It is stated, there, that the performance level for all or some classes or one class needs to be given. A Country may choose how many of the Image periods Image of fire resistance shown in Tables B.1 to B.6 will be given in its Naional Annex, and for what range of materials and loading conditions.

NOTE 2: Walls that include bed-joint reinforcement, according to EN 845-3, may be considered as covered by these tables.

NOTE 3: Thicknesses of walls given in tables for non-loadbearing masonry, ie classification EI or EI-M, are only valid for walls having a height to thickness ratio less than 40

NOTE 4: In respect to tables B.1 to B.6 above, the values of tF or lF in mm, as appropriate, for use in a Country may be found in its National Annex. The materials, that is units, grouping, density, mortar and load levels should be tabulated for the required periods of fire resistance, for example 30, 60, 90, 120, 240 minutes. For loadbearing walls, the level of loading applicable to the wall should be given. Recommended values of tF or lF for the commonly used range of units, grouping, mortar density and load levels are given in tables N.B.I to N.B.5, below. For fire walls the thickness given in the tables is for a single leaf wall; if a country wishes to distinguish between single and double leaf walls, it may do so by introducing additional lines in the National Annex, increasing the total thickness for double leaf walls if required. Throughout the tables, where two thicknesses with a slash between, eg 90/100, are given this is a range, ie the thickness recommended is from 90 to 100. In arriving at the values to be inserted in the National Annex, a Country should have regard to the available test results, the loading that was applied to the test walls, the masonry characteristics and the partial factors that will be used in that Country.

N.B.1.1 - N.B.1.6 Clay masonry
N.B.2.1 - N.B.2.6 Calcium silicate masonry
N.B.3.1 - N.B.3.6 Dense and lightweight aggregate concrete masonry
N.B.4.1 - N.B.4.6 Autoclaved aerated concrete masonry
N.B.5.1 - N.B.5.2 Manufactured stone masonry
31

Image N.B.1 Clay masonry

Clay units conforming to EN 771-1

Table N.B.1.1 Clay Masonry Minimum thickness of separating non-loadbearing walls (Criterion EI) for fire resistance classifications
row number material properties:

gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]
Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification EI for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1. Group 1S, 1, 2, 3 and 4 units
1.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer, lightweight
500 ≤ρ ≤ 2 400
1.1.1   60/100 90/100 90/100 100/140 100/170 160/190 190/210
1.1.2 (50/70) (50/70) (60/70) (70/100) (90/140) (110/140) (170)
Table N.B.1.2 Clay masonry minimum thickness of separating loadbearing single-leaf walls (Criteria REI) for fire resistance classifications
row number material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]
combined thickness ct
% of wall thickness
Minimum wall thickness (mm) tf for fire resistance classification REI for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1S Group 1S units
1S.1 5 ≤ fb ≤ 75 general purpose mortar
5 ≤ fb ≤ 50 thin layer mortar
1 000 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1S.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 90 90 90 100 100/140 170/190 170/190
1S.1.2 (70/90) (70/90) (70/90) (70/90) (90/140) (110/140) (170/190)
1S.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 90 90 90 100 100/140 170 170
1S.1.4 (70/90) (70/90) (70/90) (70/90) (100/140) (110/140) (140/170)
1 Group 1 units
mortar: general purpose, thin layer
1.2 5 ≤ fb ≤ 75
800 < ρ ≤ 2 400
1.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 90/100 90/100 90/100 100/170 140/170 170/190 190/210
1.2.2 (70/90) (70/90) (70/90) (70/90) (100/140) (110/170) (170/190)
1.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 90/100 90/100 90/100 100/140 140/170 140/170 190/200
1.2.4 (70/90) (70/90) (70/90) (70/90) (100/140) (110/170) (170/190)
1.3 5 ≤ fb ≤ 25
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 800
1.3.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 200 200 200 200/365 200/365 300/370
1.3.2 (100) (170) (170) (170) (200/300) (200/300) 300/370
1.3.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 170 170 200 200/365 200/365 300/370
1.3.4 (100) (140) (140) (170) (200/300) (200/300) 300/370
2 Group 2 units
2.1 Mortar: general purpose, thin layer
5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
800 < ρ ≤ 2 200
ct ≥ 25%
2.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 90/100 90/100 90/100 100/170 140/240 190/240 190/240
2.1.2 (90/100) (90/100) (90/100) (100/140) (140) (190/240) (190/240)
2.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 90/100 90/100 90/100 100/140 190/240 190/240 190/240
2.1.4 (90) (90) (90/100) (100/140) (100/140) (140/190) (190)

Image

32
Image

2.2

Mortar: general purpose, thin layer and lightweight
5 ≤ fb ≤ 25
700 ≤ ρ ≤ 800
ct ≥ 25%
2.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.2.2 (100) (100) (90/170) (100/240) (140/300) (170/365) nvg
2.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.2.4 (100) (100) (90/140) (100/170) (100/300) (170/300) (190/300)
2.3 mortar: general purpose, thin layer and lightweight
5 ≤ fb ≤ 25
500 < ρ ≤ 900
16% ≤ ct < 25%
2.3.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.3.2 (100) (170) (90/170) (140/240) (140/300) (365) nvg
2.3.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg 190
2.3.4 (100) (140) (90/140) (100/170) (140/300) (300) nvg
3 Group 3 units

mortar: general purpose, thin layer and lightweight

3.1 5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 200
ct ≥ 12%
3.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.2 (100) (200) (240) (300) (365) (425) nvg
3.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 300/365 300/365 300/365 300/365 300/365 300/365 365
3.1.4 (300/365) (300/365) (300/365) (300/365) (300/365) (300/365) (365)
4 Walls in which holes in units are filled with mortar or concrete
mortar: general purpose, thin layer
4.1 10 ≤ fb ≤ 35
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 200
ct ≥ 10%
4.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 90/100 90/100 90/100 140/170 140/240 170/240 190/240
4.1.2 (100) (100) (100) (100) (140) (170/190) (190)
4.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 90/100 90/100 90/100 100/140 100/170 140/240 190/240
4.1.4 (90/100) (100) (90/100) (100/140) (100/140) (140/190) (190)
5 Group 4 units

mortar: general purpose, thin layer and lightweight

5.1
5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 200
5.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
5.1.2 (200/240) (200/240) (200/240) (300) (365) (425) nvg
5.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
5.1.4 (200/240) (200/240) (200/240) (240) (300) (365) nvg

Image

33
Image Table N.B.1.3 Clay masonry minimum thickness of non-separating loadbearing single-leaf walls ≥l,0m in length
(Criterion R) for fire resistance classifications
row
number
material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]
combined thickness ct
% of wall thickness
Minimum wall thickness or length (mm) tF for fire resistance classification R for time
(minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1S Group 1S units
1S.1 5 ≤fb ≤ 75 general purpose mortar
5 ≤ fb ≤ 50 thin layer mortar
1 000 ≤ ρ ≥ 2 400
1S.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 100 100 240 365 490 nvg
1S.1.2 (100) (100) (100) (100) (170) (240) nvg
1S.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 100 100 170 240 300 nvg
1S.1.4 (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (200) nvg
1 Group 1 units
1.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
5 ≤ fb ≤ 75
800 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 100 100 240 365 490 nvg
1.1.2 (100) (100) (100) (100) (170) (240) nvg
1.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 100 100 170 240 300 nvg
1.1.4 (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (200) nvg
1.2 5 ≤ fb ≤ 25
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 800
1.2.1 α ≤ 1,0
fb < 5 N/mm2
100 100 100 240 365 490 nvg
1.2.2 (100) (100) (100) (100) (170) (240) nvg
1.2.3 α ≤ 0,6
fb < 3 N/mm2
100 100 100 170 240 300 nvg
1.2.4 (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (200) nvg
2 Group 2 units
2.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
800 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 200
ct ≥ 25%
2.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 100 100 240 365 490 nvg
2.1.2 (100) (100) (100) (100) (170) (240) nvg
2.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 100 100 170 240 300 nvg
2.1.4 (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (200) nvg
2.2 5 ≤ fb ≤ 25
700 ≤ ρ ≤ 800
ct ≥ 25%
2.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 100 100 240 365 490 nvg
2.2.2 (100/240) (100/240) (100/240) (100/240) (170/300) (240/365) nvg
2.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 100 100 170 240 300 nvg
2.2.4 (100/170) (100/170) (100/170) (100/240) (100/240) (200/300) nvg
2.3 mortar: general purpose, thin layer and lightweight
5 ≤ fb ≤ 25
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 900
16% ≤ ct ≤ 25%
2.3.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.3.2 (100/240) (100/240) (100/240) (100/240) (170/300) (240/365) nvg
2.3.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.3.4 (100/170) (100/170) (100/170) (100/240) (100/240) (200/300) nvg
3 Group 3 units

Image

34

Image

3.1
mortar: general purpose, thin layer and lightweight
5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 200
ct ≥ 12%
3.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.2 (100) (170) (240) (300) (365) (425)
3.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.4 (100) (140) (170) (240) (300) (365)
4 Walls in which holes in units are tilled with mortar or concrete
4.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
10 ≤ fb ≤ 35
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 200
ct ≥ 10%
4.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 100 100 240 365 490 nvg
4.1.2 (100) (100) (100) (100) (170) (240) nvg
4.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 100 100 170 240 300 nvg
4.1.4 (100) (100) (100) (170) (240) (300) nvg
5 Group 4 units
5.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer and lightweight
5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 200
5.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
5.1.2 (100) (170) (240) (300) (365) (425) nvg
5.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
5.1.4 (100) (140) (170) (240) (300) (365) nvg
Table N.B.1.4 Clay masonry minimum length of non-separating loadbearing single-leaf walls <1,0m in length
(Criterion R) for fire resistance classifications
row
number
material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]
combined thickness ct
% of wall thickness
wall thickness [mm] Minimum wall thickness or length (mm) tF for fire resistance classification R for time
(minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1S Group 1S units
1S.1 5 ≤fb ≤ 75 general purpose mortar
5 ≤ fb ≤ 50 thin layer mortar
1 000 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1S.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1S.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1S.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1S.1.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1 Group 1 units
1.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
5 ≤ fb ≤ 75
800 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 990 990 990 nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.2 (490) (600) (600) (730) nvg nvg nvg
1.1.3 170 600 730 730 990 nvg nvg nvg
1.1.4 (240) (240) (240) (365) (365) nvg nvg

Image

35

Image

1.1.5
240 365 490 490 600 nvg nvg nvg
1.1.6 (170) (170) (170) (240) (240) (365) nvg
1.1.7 300 300 365 365 490 nvg nvg nvg
1.1.8 (170) (170) (170) (200) (240) (300) nvg
1.1.9 α ≤ 0,6 100 600 730 730 990 nvg nvg nvg
1.1.10 (365) (490) (490) (600) (730) nvg nvg
1.1.11 170 490 600 600 730 990 nvg nvg
1.1.12 (240) (240) (240) (240) (300) nvg nvg
1.1.13 240 200 240 240 300 365 490 nvg
1.1.14 (170) (170) (170) (170) (240) (300) nvg
1.1.15 300 200 200 200 240 365 490 nvg
1.1.16 (170) (170) (170) (170) (170) (240) nvg
1.2 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
5 ≤ fb ≤ 25
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 800
1.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 990 990 990 nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.2 (490) (600) (600) (730) nvg nvg nvg
1.2.3 170 600 730 730 990 nvg nvg nvg
1.2.4 (240) (240) (240) (365) (365) nvg nvg
1.2.5 240 365 490 490 600 nvg nvg nvg
1.2.6 (170) (170) (170) (240) (240) (365) nvg
1.2.7 300 300 365 365 490 nvg nvg nvg
1.2.8 (170) (170) (170) (200) (240) (300) nvg
1.2.9 α ≤ 0,6 100 600 730 730 990 nvg nvg nvg
1.2.10 (365) (490) (490) (600) (730) nvg nvg
1.2.11 170 490 600 600 730 990 nvg nvg
1.2.12 (240) (240) (240) (240) (300) nvg nvg
1.2.13 240 200 240 240 300 365 490 nvg
1.2.14 (170) (170) (170) (170) (170) (240) nvg
1.2.15 300 200 200 200 240 365 490 nvg
1.2.16 (170) (170) (170) (170) (170) (240) nvg
2 Group 2 units
2.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
800 < ρ ≤ 2 200
ct ≥ 25%
2.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 990 990 990 nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.1.2 (490) (600) (600) (730) nvg nvg nvg
2.1.3 170 600 730 730 990 nvg nvg nvg
2.1.4 (240) (240) (240) (365) (365) nvg nvg
2.1.5 240 365 490 490 600 nvg nvg nvg
2.1.6 (170) (170) (170) (240) (240) (365) nvg
2.1.7 300 300 365 365 490 nvg nvg nvg
2.1.8 (170) (170) (170) (200) (240) (300) nvg
2.1.9 α ≤ 0,6 100 600 730 730 990 nvg nvg nvg
2.1.10 (365) (490) (490) (600) (730) nvg nvg
2.1.11 170 490 600 600 730 990 nvg nvg
2.1.12 (240) (240) (240) (240) (300) nvg nvg
2.1.13 240 200 240 240 300 365 490 nvg
2.1.14 (170) (170) (170) (170) (240) (300) nvg
2.1.15 300 200 200 200 240 365 490 nvg
2.1.16 (170) (170) (170) (170) (170) (240) nvg

Image

36

Image

2.2
5 ≤ fb ≤ 25
700 ≤ ρ ≤ 800
ct ≥ 25%
2.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 990 990 990 nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.2.2 (490) (600) (600) (730) nvg nvg nvg
2.2.3 170 600 730 730 990 nvg nvg nvg
2.2.4 (240) (240) (240) (365) (365) nvg nvg
2.2.5 240 365 490 490 600 nvg nvg nvg
2.2.6 (170) (170) (170) (240) (240) (365) nvg
2.2.7 300 300 365 365 490 nvg nvg nvg
2.2.8 (170) (170) (170) (200) (240) (300) nvg
2.2.9 α ≤ 0,6 100 600 730 730 990 nvg nvg nvg
2.2.10 (365) (490) (490) (600) (730) nvg nvg
2.2.11 170 490 600 600 730 990 nvg nvg
2.2.12 (240) (240) (240) (240) (300) nvg nvg
2.2.13 240 200 240 240 300 365 490 nvg
2.2.14 (170) (170) (170) (170) (240) (300) nvg
2.2.15 300 200 200 200 240 365 490 nvg
2.2.16 (170) (170) (170) (170) (170) (240) nvg
2.3 5 ≤ fb ≤ 25
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 900
16% < ct ≤ 25%
2.3.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.3.2 (490) (600) (600) (730) nvg nvg nvg
2.3.3 170 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.3.4 (240) (240) (240) (240) (365) (365) nvg
2.3.5 240 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.3.6 (170) (170) (170) (240) (240) (365) nvg
2.3.7 300 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.3.8 (170) (170) (170) (200) (240) (300) nvg
2.3.9 α ≤ 0,6 100 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.3.10 (365) (490) (490) (600) (730) nvg nvg
2.3.11 170 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.3.12 (240) (240) (240) (240) (300) nvg nvg
2.3.13 240 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.3.14 (170) (170) (170) (170) (240) (300) nvg
2.3.15 300 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.3.16 (170) (170) (170) (170) (170) (240) nvg
2.3.17 365 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.3.18 (100) (170) (170) (170) (240) (240) nvg

Image

37

Image

3
Group 3 units
3.1 mortar: general purpose, and lightweight
5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 200
ct ≥ 12%
3.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 240 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.2 (240) (240) (240) (300) (300) (365) nvg
3.1.3 300 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.4 (240) (240) (240) (240) (240) (300) nvg
3.1.5 365 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.6 (240) (240) (240) (240) (240) (240) nvg
3.1.7 α ≤ 0,6 240 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.8 (240) (240) (240) (240) (240) (365) nvg
3.1.9 300 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.10 (170) (170) (170) (170) (240) (240) nvg
3.1.11 365 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.12 (170) (170) (170) (170) (240) (240) nvg
4 Walls in which holes in units are filled with mortar or concrete
4.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
10 ≤ fb ≤ 35
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 200
ct ≥ 10%
4.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 990 990 990 nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.2 (490) (600) (600) (730) nvg nvg nvg
4.1.3 170 600 730 730 990 nvg nvg nvg
4.1.4 (240) (240) (240) (365) (365) nvg nvg
1.1.5 240 365 490 490 600 nvg nvg nvg
4.1.6 (170) (170) (170) (240) (240) (365) nvg
4.1.7 300 300 365 365 490 nvg nvg nvg
4.1.8 (170) (170) (170) (200) (240) (300) nvg
4.1.9 α ≤ 0,6 100 600 730 730 990 nvg nvg nvg
4.1.10 (365) (490) (490) (600) (730) nvg nvg
4.1.11 170 490 600 600 730 990 nvg nvg
4.1.12 (240) (240) (240) (240) (300) nvg nvg
4.1.13 240 200 240 240 300 365 490 nvg
4.1.14 (170) (170) (170) (170) (240) (300 nvg
4.1.15 300 200 200 200 240 365 490 nvg
4.1.16 (170) (170) (170) (170) (170) (240) nvg

Image

38

Image

5
Group 4 units
5.1 mortar: general purpose, and lightweight
5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 200
5.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 240 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
5.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
5.1.3 300 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
5.1.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
5.1.5 365 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
5.1.6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
5.1.7 α ≤ 0,6 240 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
5.1.8 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
5.1.9 300 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
5.1.10 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
5.1.11 365 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
5.1.12 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
Table N.B.1.5 Clay masonry minimum thickness of separating loadbearing and non-loadbearing single and double leaf fire walls
Criteria REI-M and EI-M) for fire resistance classifications
row
number
material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]
combined thickness ct
% of wall thickness
Minimum wall thickness or length (mm) tF for fire resistance classification REI-M and EI-M for time
(minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1S Group 1S units
1S.1 5 ≤fb ≤ 75 general purpose mortar
5 ≤ fb ≤ 50 thin layer mortar
1 000 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1S.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 240 240 240 240 365 365 nvg
1S.1.2 (170) (170) (170) (170) (365) (365) nvg
1S.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 240 240 240 240 365 365 nvg
1S.1.4 (170) (170) (170) (170) (365) (365) nvg
1 Group 1 units
1.1 5 ≤fb ≤ 75
800 ≤ ρ ≥ 2 400
1.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 240 240 240 240 365 365 nvg
1.1.2 (170) (170) (170) (170) (365) (365) nvg
1.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 240 240 240 240 365 365 nvg
1.1.4 (170) (170) (170) (170) (365) (365) nvg
1.2 5 ≤fb ≤ 25
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 800
1.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 240 240 240 240/300 365 365 nvg
1.2.2 (170) (170) (170) (170/240) (365) (365) nvg
1.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 240 240 240 240/300 365 365 nvg
1.2.4 (170) (170) (170) (170/240) (365) (365) nvg

Image

39

Image

2
Group 2 units
2.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
800 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 200
ct ≥ 25%
2.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 240 240 240 240 365 365 nvg
2.1.2 (170) (170) (170) (170) (365) (365) nvg
2.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 240 240 240 240 365 365 nvg
2.1.4 (170) (170) (170) (170) (365) (365) nvg
2.2 mortar: general purpose, thin layer and lightweight
5 ≤ fb ≤ 25
700 ≤ ρ ≤ 800
ct ≥ 25%
2.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 240/365 240/365 240/365 240/365 365 365 nvg
2.2.2 (170/240) (170/240) (170/240) (170/300) (365) (365) nvg
2.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 240/365 240/365 240/365 240/365 365 365 nvg
2.2.4 (170/240) (170/240) (170/240) (170/240) (365) (365) nvg
2.3 mortar: general purpose, thin layer and lightweight
5 ≤ fb ≤ 25
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 900
16% ≤ ct ≤ 25%
2.3.1 α ≤ 1,0 365 365 365 365 nvg nvg nvg
2.3.2 (170) (170) (170) (170/365) (365) (365) nvg
2.3.3 α ≤ 0,6 365 365 365 365 nvg nvg nvg
2.3.4 (170) (170) (170) (170/300) (365) (365) nvg
3 Group 3 units
3.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
vertical perforation
5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 200
ct ≥ 12%
3.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.2 (365) (365) (365) (365) nvg nvg nvg
3.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.4 (365) (365) (365) (365) nvg nvg nvg
4 Walls in which holes in units are filled with mortar or concrete
4.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 200
ct ≥ 10%
4.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 240 240 240 240 nvg nvg nvg
4.1.2 (170) (170) (170) (170) nvg nvg nvg
4.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 240 240 240 240 nvg nvg nvg
4.1.4 (170) (170) (170) (170) nvg nvg nvg
5 Group 4 units
5.1 mortar: general purpose, lightweight, thin layer,
5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 200
ct ≥ 12%
5.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
5.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg

Image

40

Image

5.1.3
α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
5.1.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
Table N.B.1.6 Clay masonry minimum thickness of each leaf of separating loadbearing cavity walls with one leaf loaded
Criteria REI) for fire resistance classifications
row
number
material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]
combined thickness ct
% of wall thickness
Minimum wall thickness or length (mm) tF for fire resistance classification R for time
(minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1S Group 1S units
1S.1 5 ≤ fb ≤ 75 general purpose mortar
5 ≤ fb ≤ 50 thin layer mortar
1 000 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1S.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 90 90 90 100 100 nvg nvg
1S.1.2 (90) (90) (90) (90) (100) nvg nvg
1S.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 90 90 90 100 100 nvg nvg
1S.1.4 (90) (90) (90) (90) (100) nvg nvg
1 Group 1 units
1.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
5 ≤ fb ≤ 75
800 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 90 90 90 100 100/170 nvg nvg
1.1.2 (90) (90) (90) (90/100) (100) nvg nvg
1.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 90 90 90 100 100/140 nvg nvg
1.1.4 (90) (90) (90) (90) (100) nvg nvg
1.2 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
5 ≤ fb ≤ 25
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 800
1.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 170 170 240 365 nvg nvg
1.2.2 (100) (140) (140) (200) (300) nvg nvg
1.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 140 170 200 300 nvg nvg
1.2.4 (100) (140) (170) (200) (300) nvg nvg
2 Group 2 units
2.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
800 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 200
ct ≥ 25%
2.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 100 100 140/170 170/240 nvg nvg
2.1.2 (100) (100) (100) (100) (100/240) nvg nvg
2.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 100 100 100/140 170 nvg nvg
2.1.4 (100) (100) (100) (100) (100/140) nvg nvg
2.2 15 ≤ fb ≤ 25
700 ≤ ρ ≤ 800
ct ≥ 25%
2.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 100 100 170 240 nvg nvg
2.2.2 (100) (100) (100) (100) (140) nvg nvg
2.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 100 100 140 170 nvg nvg
2.2.4 (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) nvg nvg

Image

41

Image

2.3
mortar: general purpose, thin layer and lightweight
5 ≤ fb ≤ 25
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 900
16% ≤ ct ≤ 25%
2.3.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.3.2 (100) (100) (100/170) (100/240) (140/300) nvg nvg
2.3.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 100 100 140 170 nvg nvg
2.3.4 (100) (100) (100/140) (100/170) (100/300) nvg nvg
3 Group 3 units
3.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 200
ct ≥ 12%
3.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.2 (100) (170) (240) (300) (365) nvg nvg
3.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.4 (100) (140) (170) (340) (300) nvg nvg
4 Walls in which holes in units are filled with mortar or concrete
4.1 mortar: general purpose, and thin layer
10 ≤ fb ≤ 35
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 200
ct ≥ 10%
4.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 100 100 170 240 nvg nvg
4.1.2 (100) (100) (100) (100) (140) nvg nvg
4.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 100 100 140 170 nvg nvg
4.1.4 (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) nvg nvg
5 Group 4 units
5.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer and lightweight
5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 200
5.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
5.1.2 (100) (170) (240) (300) (365) nvg nvg
5.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
5.1.4 (100) (140) (170) (240) (300) nvg nvg

N.B.2 Calcium silicate masonry

Calcium silicate units conforming to EN 771-2 Image

42
Image Table N.B.2.1 Calcium silicate masonry minimum thickness of separating non-loadbearing separating walls (Criteria E1) for fire resistance classifications
row number material properties:

gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]

Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification EI for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1 Group 1S, 1, 2 and 3 units
1.1 mortar: general purpose,
600 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1.1.1   70 70/90 70/90 100 100/140 140/170 140/200
1.1.2   (50) (70) (70) (90) (90/40) (140) (170)
 
1.2 mortar: thin layer
600 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1.2.1   70 70/90 70/90 100 100/140 140/170 140/200
1.1.2   (50) (70) (70) (100) (100/40) (140) (170)
Table N.B.2.2 Calcium silicate masonry minimum thickness of separating loadbearing single-leaf walls (Criteria REI) for fire resistance classifications
row number material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]
Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification REI for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1S Group 1units
1S.1 mortar: general purpose,
12 ≤ fb ≤ 75
1 700 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1S.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 90 90 90 100 100/170 170 140/190
1S.1.2 (90) (90) (90) (90/100) (100/140) (170) (140/190)
1S.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 90 90 90 100 100/70 170 140/190
1S.1.4 (90) (90) (90) (90/100) (100/140) (170) (140/190)
1S.2 mortar: thin layer,
12 ≤ fb ≤ 15
1 700 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1S.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 90 90 90 100 100/170 170 140/190
1S.2.2 (90) (90) (90) (90/100) (90/140) (170) (140/190)
1S.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 90 90 90 100 100/170 170 140/190
1S.2.4 (90) (90) (90) (90/100) (90/140) (170) (140/190)
1 Group 1 units
1.1 mortar: general purpose,
12 ≤ fb ≤ 75
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 90/100 90/100 90/100 100 100/200 190/240 190/240
1.1.2 (90/100) (90/100) (90/100) (90/100) (140) (170/190) (140)
1.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 90/100 90/100 90/100 100 120/200 170/240 190/240
1.1.4 (90/100) (90/100) (90/100) (100) (100) (140) (140)
1.2 mortar: thin layer,
12 ≤ fb ≤ 75
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 90/100 90/100 90/100 100 100/200 190/240 190/240
1.2.2 (90/100) (90/100) (90/100) (90/100) (140) (170/190) (140)
1.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 90/100 90/100 90/100 100 120/40 170/200 190/200
1.2.4 (90/100) (90/100) (90/100) (100) (100) (140) (140)
2 Group 2 units

Image

43
Image 2.1 mortar: general purpose,
6 ≤ fb ≤ 35
700 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 600
2.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 100 100 100/140 200 240 nvg
2.1.2 (100) (100) (100) (100) (170) (190) nvg
2.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 100 100 100 140 200 nvg
2.1.4 (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (140) nvg
2.2 mortar: thin layer,
6 ≤ fb ≤ 35
700 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 600
2.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 100 100 100/140 200 240 nvg
2.2.2 (100) (100) (100) (100) (170) (190) nvg
2.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 100 100 100 140 200 nvg
2.2.4 (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (140) nvg
Table N.B.2.3 Calcium silicate masonry minimum thickness of separating loadbearing single-leaf walls ≥ 1,0m in length (Criteria R) for fire resistance classifications
row number material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]
Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification R for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1S Group 1S units
1S.1 mortar: general purpose,
15 ≤ fb ≤ 75
1 700 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1S.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 100 100 100/140 200 240 nvg
1S.1.2 (100) (100) (100) (100/140) (170) (200) nvg
1S.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 100 100 100/140 170 200 nvg
1S.1.4 (100) (100) (100) (100/140) (170) (200) nvg
1S.2 mortar: thin layer,
15 ≤ fb ≤ 75
1 700 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1S.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 100 100 100/140 200 240 nvg
1S.2.2 (100) (100) (100) (100) (170) (190) nvg
1S.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 100 100 100/140 170 200 nvg
1S.2.4 (100) (100) (100) (100) (170) (170) nvg
1 Group 1 units
1.1 mortar: general purpose,
12 ≤ fb ≤ 75
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 100 100 140 200 240 nvg
1.1.2 (100) (100) (100) (100) (170) (190) nvg
1.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 100 100 1001/140 170 200 nvg
1.1.4 (100) (100) (100) (100/140) (170) (200) nvg
1.2 mortar: thin layer,
12 ≤ fb ≤ 75
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 100 100 100/140 200 240 nvg
1.2.2 (100) (100) (100) (100/140) (170) (200) nvg
1.2.3 α ≤0,6 100 100 100 100/140 170 200 nvg
1.2.2 (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (170) nvg
2 Group 2 units

Image

44
Image 2.1 mortar: general purpose,
6 ≤ fb ≤ 35
700 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 600
2.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 100 100 140 200 240 nvg
2.1.2 (100) (100) (100) (100) (170) (200) nvg
2.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 100 100 140 170 200 nvg
2.1.4 (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (170) nvg
2.2 mortar: thin layer,
6 ≤ fb ≤ 35
700 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 600
2.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 100 100 140 200 240 nvg
2.2.2 (100) (100) (100) (100) (170) (200) nvg
2.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 100 100 140 170 200 nvg
2.2.4 (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (170) nvg

Image

45
Image Table N.B.2.4 Calcium silicate masonry minimum length of non-separating loadbearing single-leaf walls <1,0m in length
(Criterion R) for fire resistance classifications
row
number
material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ
[kg/m3]
wall thickness [ mm ] Minimum wall thickness (mm) lF for fire resistance classification R for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1 Group 1 and Group 2 units
1.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
15 ≤ fb ≤ 75
1 700 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 490 630 630 990 1 000 1 000 1 000
1.1.2 (365) (490) (490) (730) (990) nvg nvg
1.1.3 140 365 490 490 730 990 1 000 1 000
1.1.4 (300) (365) (365) (630) (730) nvg nvg
1.1.5 150 365 490 490 730 990 1 000 1 000
1.1.6 (300) (365) (365) (630) (730) nvg nvg
1.1.7 170 240 240 240 300 300 490 nvg
1.1.8 (240) (240) (240) (240) (240) (300) nvg
1.1.9 200 240 240 240 300 300 490 nvg
1.1.10 (240) (240) (240) (240) (240) (300) nvg
1.1.11 240 170 170 170 240 240 365 nvg
1.1.12 (nvg) (nvg) (nvg) (170) (170) nvg nvg
1.1.13 300 170 170 170 170 170 300 nvg
1.1.14           (200) nvg
1.1.15 365 nvg 170 170 170 170 240 nvg
1.1.16 (100) (nvg) (nvg) (nvg) (nvg) (nvg) nvg
1.1.17 α ≤ 0,6 100 365 490 490 730 1 000 1 000 nvg
1.1.18 (300) (365) (365) (615) (990) nvg nvg
1.1.19 140 300 300 300 615 730 990 nvg
1.1.20 (240) (300) (300) (490) (615) (730) nvg
1.1.21 150 300 300 300 615 730 990 nvg
1.1.22 (240) (300) (300) (490) (615) (730) nvg
1.1.23 170 240 240 240 240 240 365 nvg
1.1.24 (240) (240) (240) (240) (240) (365) nvg
1.1.25 200 240 240 240 240 240 365 nvg
1.1.26 (240) (240) (240) (240) (240) (365) nvg
1.1.27 240 170 170 170 170 170 300 nvg
1.1.28 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.29 300 170 170 170 170 170 240 nvg
1.1.30 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.31 365 170 170 170 170 170 170 nvg
1.1.32 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg

Image

46
Image Table N.B.2.5 Calcium silicate masonry minimum thickness of separating loadbearing and non-loadbearing
sigle and double leaf fire walls
(Criteria REI-M and EI-M) for fire resistance classifications
row
number
material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ
[kg/m3]
Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification REI-M and EI-M for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1S Group 1S units
1S.1 mortar: general purpose
12.5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
1 700 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1S.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 170/240 170/240 170/240 170/240 240/300 240/300 nvg
1S.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1S.1.3 α ≤ 1,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1S.1.4 nvg nvg nvg (170) nvg nvg nvg
1S.2 mortar: thin layer
12. ≤ fb ≤ 35
1 700 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1S.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 170/240 170/240 170/240 170/240 240/300 240/300 nvg
1S.2.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1S.2.3 α ≤ 1,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1S.2.4 nvg nvg nvg (170) nvg nvg nvg
1 Group 1 units
1.1 mortar: general purpose
12.5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 240 240 240 240 300 300/365 nvg
1.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg 170 nvg 240 nvg
1.1.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2 mortar: thin layer
12,5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 240 240 240 240 300 300/365 nvg
1.2.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg 170 nvg 240 nvg
1.2.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2 Group 2 units
2.1 mortar: general purpose
6 ≤ fb ≤ 35
700 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 600
2.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 300 300 300 300 300/365 365/490 nvg
2.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.1.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.2 mortar: thin layer
6 ≤ fb ≤ 35
700 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 600
2.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 300 300 300 300 300/365 365/490 nvg
2.2.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.2.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg

Image

47
Image Table N.B.2.6 Calcium silicate masonry minimum thickness of leaf of separating loadbearing cavity walls with one leaf loaded (Criteria REI) for fire resistance classifications
row
number
material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ
[kg/m3]
Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification REI for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1S Group 1S units
1S.1 mortar: general purpose
12,5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
1 700 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1S.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 90 90 90 100 140/170 170 190
1S.1.2 (90) (90) (90) (90/100) (100/140) (170) (190)
1S.1.3 α ≤ 1,0 90 90 90 100 140/170 170 190
1S.1.4 (90) (90) (90) (90/100) (100/140) (170) (190)
1S.2 mortar: thin layer
12,5 ≤ fb ≤ 35
1 700 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1S.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 90 90 90 100 140/170 170 190
1S.2.2 (90) (90) (90) (90/100) (100/140) (170) (190)
1S.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 90 90 90 100 140/170 170 190
1S.2.4 (90) (90) (90) (90/100) (100/140) (170) (190)
1 Group 1 units
1.1 mortar: general purpose
8 ≤ fb ≤ 48
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 90/100 90/100 90/100 100 140/200 190/240 190/240
1.1.2 (90/100) (90/100) (90/100) (90/100) (140) (170/190) nvg
1.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 90/100 90/100 90/100 100 140 170/200 190/200
1.1.4 (90/100) (90/100) (90/100) (100) (100) (140) nvg
1.2 mortar: thin layer
8 ≤ fb ≤ 48
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 90/100 90/100 90/100 100 140/200 190/240 190/240
1.2.2 (90/100) (90/100) (90/100) (90/100) (140) (170/190) nvg
1.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 90/100 90/100 90/100 100 120/140 170/200 190/200
1.2.4 (90/100) (90/100) (90/100) (100) (100) (140) nvg
2 Group 2 units
2.1 mortar: general purpose
6 ≤ fb ≤ 35
700 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 000
2.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 100 100 100 200 240 nvg
2.1.2 (100) (100) (100) (100) (170) (190) nvg
2.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 100 100 100 140 200 nvg
2.1.4 (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (140) nvg
2.2 mortar: thin layer
6 ≤ fb ≤ 35
700 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 000
2.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 100 100 100 200 240 nvg
2.2.2 (100) (100) (100) (100) (170) (190) nvg
2.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 100 100 100 140 200 nvg
2.2.4 (100) (100) (100) (100) (100) (140) nvg

Image

48

Image N.B.3 Dense and lightweight aggregate concrete masonry

Dense and lightweight aggregate concrete units conforming to EN 771-3

Table N.B.3.1 Dense and lightweight aggregate concrete masonry minimum thickness of separating non-loadbearing separating walls (Criteria EI) for fire resistance classifications
row
number
material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ
[kg/m3]
Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification EI for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1 Group 1 units

mortar: general purpose, thin layer, lightweight
1.1 lightweight aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 15
400 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 600
1.1.1   50 70 70/90 70/140 70/140 90/140 100/190
1.1.2 (50) (50) (50/70) (60/70) (70/140) (70/140) (70/170)
1.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 35
1 200 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1.2.1   50 70 70/90 90/140 90/140 100/190 100/190
1.2.2 (50) (50) (50/70) (70) (70/90) (90/100) (100/170)
2 Group 2 units

mortar: general purpose, thin layer, lightweight
2.1 lightweight aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 15
240 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 200
2.1.1   50 70 70/100 70/90 100/140 100/200 140/200
2.1.2 (50) (50) (50/90) (70) (70/140) (90/100) (100/200)
2.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 35
720 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 650
2.2.1   50 70 70/100 70/90 90/200 100/200 125/200
2.2.2 (50) (50) (50/70) (70) (90/140) (90/140) (100/200)
3 Group 3 units

mortar: general purpose, thin layer, lightweight
3.1 lightweight aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 10
160 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 000
3.1.1   nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 20
480 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 000
3.2.1   100 nvg 150 200 nvg nvg nvg
3.2.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4 Walls in which holes in units are filled with mortar or concrete
mortar: general purpose and thin layer
4.1 lightweight aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 10
160 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 000
4.1.1   nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 20
480 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 000
4.2.1   nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg

Image

49
Image Table N.B.3.2 Dense and lightweight aggregate concrete masonry minimum thickness of separating loadbearing single-leaf walls
(Criteria REI) for fire resistance classifications
row
number
material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ
[kg/m3]
Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification REI for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1 Group 1 units

mortar: general purpose, thin layer, lightweight
1.1 lightweight aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 15
400 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 400
1.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 90/170 90/170 90/170 100/170 100/190 140/240 150/300
1.1.2 (90/140) (90/140) (90/140) (90/140) (90/170) (100/190) (100/240)
1.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 70/140 70/140 70/140 90/170 90/170 100/190 100/240
1.1.4 (60/100) (60/100) (60/100) (70/100) (70/140) (90/170) (90/190)
1.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 35
1 200 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 400
1.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 90/170 90/170 90/170 90/170 100/190 140/240 150/300
1.2.2 (90/140) (100/140) (90/140) (90/140) (90/170) (100/190) (100/240)
1.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 70/140 90/140 70/140 90/170 90/170 100/190 140/240
1.2.4 (60/100) (70/100) (70/100) (70/100) (70/140) (90/170) (100/190)
2 Group 2 units

mortar: general purpose, thin layer, lightweight
2.1 lightweight aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 15
240 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 200
2.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 90/170 100/170 100/170 100/170 100/190 140/240 150/300
2.1.2 (90/140) (90/140) (90/140) (90/140) (100/170) (140/190) (140/240)
2.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 70/140 70/140 90/140 90/170 100/170 125/190 140/240
2.1.4 (70/100) (70/100) (70/100) (70/100) (90/140) (100/170) (125/190)
2.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 35
720 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 650
2.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 90/170 100/170 100/170 100/170 100/190 140/240 150 /300
2.2.2 (90/140) (90/140) (90/140) (100/140) (100/170) (140/190) (150/240)
2.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 90/140 90/140 100/140 100/170 100/170 140/190 150/240
2.2.4 (70/100) (90/100) (90/100) (90/100) (100/140) (125/170) (140/190)
3 Group 3 units

mortar: general purpose, thin layer, lightweight
3.1 lightweight aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 10
160 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 000
3.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 20
480 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 000
3.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg 140 140/200 200 nvg
3.2.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg

Image

50
4 Walls in which holes in units are filled with mortar or concrete
mortar: general purpose and thin layer
4.1 lightweight aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 10
160 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 000
4.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 20
480 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 000
4.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
Table N.B.3.3 Dense and lightweight aggregate concrete masonry minimum thickness of non-separating loadbearing single-leaf walls ≥1,0m in length (Criterion R) for fire resistance classifications
row number material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]
Minimum wall thickness or length (mm) tF for fire resistance classification R for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1 Group 1units
mortar: general purpose, thin layer, light weight
1.1 lightweight aggregate 2 ≤ fb ≤ 8
400 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 400
1.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 170 170 170 240 300 300 365
1.1.2 (170) (170) (170) (170) (240) (240) (300)
1.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 170 170 170 190 240 240 300
1.1.4 (140) (140) (140) (170) (190) (240) (240)
1.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 20
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 000
1.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 170 170 170 240 300 300 365
1.2.2 (170) (170) (170) (190) (240) (240) (300)
2 Group 2 units
mortar: general purpose, thin layer, lightweight
2.1 lightweight aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 8
400 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 400
2.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 170 170 170 240 300 300 365
2.1.2 (170) (170) (170) (170) (240) (240) (300)
2.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 170 170 170 190 240 240 300
2.1.4 (140) (170) (140) (170) (190) (240) (240)
2.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 20
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 000
 
2.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 170 170 170 240 300 300 365
2.2.2 (170) (170) (170) (240) (300) (300) (365)

Image

51
Image 2.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 170 170 170 190 240 240 300
2.2.4 (140) (170) (140) (170) (190) (240) (240)
3 Group 3 units
mortar: general purpose, thin layer, lightweight
3.1 lightweight aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 8
400 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 400
3.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 20
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 000
 
3.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.2 (nvg) nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4 Walls in which holes in units are filled with mortar or concrete
mortar: general purpose, thin layer
4.1 light weighted
2 ≤ fb ≤ 8
400 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 400
4.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 20
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 000
 
4.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg

Image

52
Image Table N.B.3.4 Dense and lightweight aggregate concrete masonry minimum thickness of non-separating loadbearing single-leaf walls <1,0m in length (Criterion R) for fire resistance classifications
row number material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]
wall thickness [mm] Minimum wall thickness or length (mm) lF for fire resistance classification R for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1 Group 1 units
mortar: general purpose, thin layer, lightweight
1.1 lightweight aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 8
400 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 400
1.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.3 170 365/490 490 490 1 000 1 000 1 000 1 000
1.1.4 (365) nvg nvg (490) nvg nvg nvg
1.1.5 240 240 300 300 365 1 000 1 000 nvg
1.1.6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.7 300 240 240 240 300 365 490 nvg
1.1.8 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.9 α ≤ 0,6 100 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.10 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.11 170 240 365 365 490 1 000 1 000 nvg
1.1.12 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.13 240 170 240 240 300 365 490 nvg
1.1.14 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.15 300 170 240 240 240 300 365 nvg
1.1.16 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 20
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 000
1.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.3 170 300/365 nvg 490 365/1 000 1 000 1 000 nvg
1.2.4 (240) nvg nvg (300) (365) (490) nvg
1.2.5 240 240 300 300 365 1 000 1 000 nvg
1.2.6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.7 300 240 240 240 300 365 490 nvg
1.2.8 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.9 α ≤ 0,6 100 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.10 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.11 170 240 nvg nvg 300 365 490 nvg
1.2.12 (240) nvg nvg (240) (300) (365) nvg
1.2.13 240 170 240 240 300 365 490 nvg
1.2.14 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.15 300 170 240 240 240 300 365 nvg
1.2.16 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg

Image

53
Image 2 Group 2 units
mortar: general purpose, thin layer, lightweight
2.1 lightweight aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 8
400 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 400
2.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.1.3 170 365/490 490 490 1 000 1 000 1 000 nvg
2.1.4 (365) nvg nvg (490) nvg nvg nvg
2.1.5 240 240 300 300 365 1 000 1 000 nvg
2.1.6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.1.7 300 240 240 240 300 365 490 nvg
2.1.8 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.1.9 α ≤ 0,6 100 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.1.10 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.1.11 170 240 365 365 490 1 000 1 000 nvg
2.1.12 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.1.13 240 170 240 240 300 365 490 nvg
2.1.14 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.1.15 300 170 240 240 240 300 365 nvg
2.1.16 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 20
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 000
2.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.2.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.2.3 170 300/365 nvg 490 365/1 000 1 000 1 000 nvg
2.2.4 (240) nvg nvg (300) (365) (490) nvg
2.2.5 240 240 300 300 365 1 000 1 000 nvg
2.2.6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.2.7 300 240 240 240 300 365 490 nvg
2.2.8 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.2.9 α ≤ 0,6 100 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.2.10 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.2.11 170 240 nvg nvg 300 365 490 nvg
2.2.12 (240) nvg nvg (240) (300) (365) nvg
2.2.13 240 170 240 240 300 365 490 nvg
2.2.14 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.2.15 300 170 240 240 240 300 365 nvg
2.2.16 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg

Image

54
Image 3 Group 3 units
mortar: general purpose, thin layer, lightweight
3.1 Light weighted aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 8
400 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 400
3.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 240 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.3 300 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.5 365 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.7 α ≤ 0,6 240 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.8 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.9 300 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.10 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.11 365 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.12 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 20
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 000
3.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 240 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.3 300 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.5 365 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.7 α ≤ 0,6 240 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.8 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.9 300 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.10 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.11 365 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.12 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4 Wall in which holes in units are filled with mortar or concrete
mortar: general purpose, thin layer
4.1 light weighted
2 ≤ fb ≤ 8
400 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 400
4.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 240 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.3 300 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.5 365 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.7 α ≤ 0,6 240 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.8 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.9 300 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.10 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.11 365 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.12 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg

Image

55
Image 4.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 20
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 000
4.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 240 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.3 300 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.5 365 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.7 α ≤ 0,6 240 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.8 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.9 300 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.10 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.11 365 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.12 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
Table N.B.3.5 Dense and lightweight aggregate concrete masonry minimum thickness of separating loadbearing and non-loadbearing single and double leaf fire walls (Criteria REI-M and EI-M) for fire resistance classifications
row number material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]
Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification REI-M and EI-M for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1 Group 1 units
mortar: general purpose, thin layer, lightweight
1.1 lightweight aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 8
400 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 400
1.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg 300 nvg nvg nvg
1.1.2 nvg nvg nvg (240) nvg nvg nvg
1.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 20
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 000
1.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg 240 nvg nvg nvg
1.2.2 nvg nvg nvg (170) nvg nvg nvg
1.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2 Group 2 units
mortar: general purpose, thin layer, lightweight
2.1 lightweight aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 8
400 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 400
2.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg 300 nvg nvg nvg
2.1.2 nvg nvg nvg (240) nvg nvg nvg
2.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.1.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 20
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 000
2.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg 240 nvg nvg nvg
2.2.2 nvg nvg nvg (170) nvg nvg nvg

Image

56
Image

2.2.3

α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
2.2.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3 Group 3 units
mortar: general purpose, thin layer, lightweight
3.1 lightweight aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 8
400 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 400
3.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 20
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 000
3.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4 Walls in which holes in units are filled with mortar or concrete
mortar: general purpose and thin layer
4.1 lightweight aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 8
400 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 400
4.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 20
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 000
4.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg

Image

57
Image Table N.B.3.6 Dense and lightweight aggregate concrete masonry minimum thickness of each leaf of separating loadbearing cavity walls with one leaf loaded (Criteria REI) for tire resistance classifications
row number material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]
Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification REI for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1 Group 1 units
mortar: general purpose, thin layer, lightweight
1.1 lightweight aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 15
400 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 600
1.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 90 90 90 100/240 100/240 nvg nvg
1.1.2 (90) (90) (90) (90/170) (90/170) nvg nvg
1.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 70 70 70 90 90 nvg nvg
1.1.4 (60) (60) (60) (2 × 70) (70) nvg nvg
1.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 20
1 200 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 200
1.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 90 90 90 90/170 100/170 nvg nvg
1.2.2 (90) (90) (90) (90/170) (90/170) nvg nvg
1.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 70 70 70 90 90 nvg nvg
1.2.4 (60) (70) (70) (70) (70) nvg nvg
2 Group 2 units
mortar: general purpose, thin layer, lightweight
2.1 lightweight aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 8
400 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 400
2.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 90 100 100 100/240 100/240 nvg nvg
2.1.2 (90) (90) (90) (90/170) (100/240) nvg nvg
2.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 70 70 90 90 100 nvg nvg
2.1.4 (70) (70) (70) (70) (90) nvg nvg
2.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 35
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 000
2.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 90 100 100 100/170 100/170 nvg nvg
2.2.2 (90) (90) (90) (100/170) (100/170) nvg nvg
2.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 90 100 100 100 100/170 nvg nvg
2.2.4 (70) (90) (90) (90) (100) nvg nvg
3 Group 3 units
mortar: general purpose, thin layer, lightweight
3.1 lightweight aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 10
400 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 400
3.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.1.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 20
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 000
3.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
3.2.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4 Walls in which holes in units are filled with mortar or concrete
mortar: general purpose and thin layer

Image

58
Image

4.1

lightweight aggregate
2 ≤ fb ≤ 15
400 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 400
4.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.1.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2 dense aggregate
6 ≤ fb ≤ 20
1 400 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 000
4.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
4.2.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg

N.B.4 Autoclavad aerated concrete masonry

Auloclaved aerated concrete units conforming to EN 771-4

Table N.B.4.1 Autoclaved aerated concrete masonry minimum thickness of separating non-loadbearing walls (Criteria EI) for fire resistance classifications
row number material properties:
gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]
Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification EI for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1 Group 1S and 1 units
1.1 Mortar: general purpose, thin layer
1.1.1 350 ≤ ρ ≤ 500 50/70 60/65 60/75 60/100 70/100 90/150 100/190
1.1.2 (50) (60/65) (60/75) (60/70) (70/90) (90/115) (100/190)
1.1.3 500 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 000 50/70 60 60 60/100 60/100 90/150 100/190
1.1.4 (50) (50/60) (50/60) (50/60) (60/90) (90/100) (100/190)
Table N.B.4.2 Autoclaved aerated concrete masonry minimum thickness of separating loadbearing single-leaf walls (Criteria REI) for fire resistance classifications
row number material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]
Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification REI for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1 Group 1S and 1 units
1.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
2 ≤ fb ≤ 4
350 ≤ ρ ≤ 500
1.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 90/115 90/115 90/140 90/200 90/225 140/300 150/300
1.1.2 (90/115) (90/115) (90/115) (90/200) (90/225) (140/240) (150/300)
1.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 90/115 90/115 90/115 100/150 90/175 140/200 150/200
1.1.4 (90/ 115) (90/115) (90/115) (90/1 15) (90/150) (140/200) (150/200)
1.2 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
4 ≤ fb ≤ 8
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 000
1.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 90/100 90/100 90/150 90/170 90/200 125/240 150/300
1.2.2 (90/100) (90/100) (90/100) (90/150) (90/170) (100/200) (100/240)
1.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 90/100 90/100 90/100 90/150 90/170 125/140 150/240
1.2.4 (90/100) (90/100) (90/100) (90/100) (90/125) (125/140) (150/200)

Image

59
Image Table N.B.4.3 Autoclaved aerated concrete masonry minimum thickness of non-separating loadbearing single-leaf walls ≥ 1,0m in length (Criterion R) for fire resistance classifications
row number material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]
Minimum wall thickness or length (mm) tF for fire resistance classification R for time (minutes)
tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1 Group 1S and 1 units
1.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
2 ≤ fb ≤ 4
350 ≤ ρ ≤ 500
1.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 170 170 170/200 240 240/300 300 300
1.1.2 (150) (150) (150) (170) (240) (240) (300)
1.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 125 150 150/170 170 170 240 300
1.1.3 (100) (125) (125/150) (150) (150) (170) (200)
1.2 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
4 ≤ fb ≤ 8
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 000
1.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 125 125 150/170 170 240 240 240
1.2.2 (100) (100) (125/150) (150) (170) (170) (240)
1.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 100 100 125/150 150 150 170 240
1.2.4 (100) (100) (100/125) (125) (125) (150) (170)
Table N.B.4.4 Autoclaved aerated concrete masonry minimum length of non-separating loadbearing single-leaf walls <l,0m in length (Criterion R) for fire resistance classifications
row number material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]
wall thickness [mm] Minimum wall length (mm) l F for fire resistance classification R for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1 Group 1S and 1 units
1.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
2 ≤ fb ≤ 4
350 ≤ ρ ≤ 500
1.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.3 125 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.5 150 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.7 170 490 490 490 1000 1000 1000 1000
1.1.8 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.9 200 365 490 490 1000 1000 1000 1000
1.1.10 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.11 240 300 365 365 615 730 730 730/990
1.1.12 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.13 300 240 300 300 490 490 615 615/730
1.1.14 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.15 365 200 240 240 365 490 615 615/730
1.1.16 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.17 α ≤ 0,6 100 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.18 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.19 125 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.20 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.21 150 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.22 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.23 170 365 365 365 490 490 490/615 1 000
1.1.24 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg

Image

60

Image

1.1.25
200 240 365 365 365 490 490/615 1 000
1.1.26 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.27 240 240 240 240 300 365 365/615 730
1.1.28 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.29 300 240 240 240 240 300 300/490 615
1.1.30 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.31 365 170 170 170 240 240 240/365 615/490
1.1.32 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
4 ≤ fb ≤ 8
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 000
1.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 100 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.2
1.2.3 125 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.5 150 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.7 170 365/490 365/490 365/490 730 1000 1000 1000
1.2.8 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.9 200 240/365 365 365/490 615 730 730 730/990
1.2.10 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.11 240 240/300 300 240/365 490/615 365/490 490/615 365/615
1.2.12 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.13 300 200/240 240 240/300 365/490 365/490 490/615 365/615
1.2.14 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.15 365 170/200 200 175/240 300/365 365/490 490/615 365/615
1.2.16 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.17 α ≤ 0,6 100 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.18 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.19 125 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.20 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.21 150 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.22 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.23 170 300/365 300 300/365 365/490 365/490 490/615 615
1.2.24 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.25 200 200/240 300 300/365 300/365 365/490 490/615 615
1.2.26 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.27 240 200/240 200 200/240 240/300 300/365 490/615 615
1.2.28 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.29 300 200/240 200 200/240 200/240 240/300 365/490 490
1.2.30 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.31 365 150/240 150 150/240 200/240 200/240 300/365 365
1.2.32 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg

Image

61
Image Table N.B.4.5 Autoclaved aerated concrete masonry minimum thickness of separating loadbearing and non-loadbearing single and double leaf fire walls (Criteria REI-M and EI-M) for fire resistance classifications
row number material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]
Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification REI-M and EI-M for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 60 90 120 180 240
1 Group 1S and 1 units
1.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
2 ≤ fb ≤ 4
350 ≤ ρ ≤ 500
1.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 300 300 300 365 365 nvg
1.1.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.1.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
4 ≤ fb ≤ 8
500 ≤ ρ ≤ 1 000
1.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 300/240 300/240 300/240 365/300 365/300 nvg
1.2.2 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
1.2.4 nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg nvg
Table N.B.4.6 Autoclaved aerated concrete masonry minimum thickness of each leaf of separating loadbearing cavity walls with one leaf loaded (Criteria REI) for fire resistance classifications
row number material properties:
unit strength fb [N/mm2]
gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]
Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification REI for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 45 60 90 120 180 240
1 Group 1S and 1 units
1.1 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
2 ≤ fb ≤ 4
350 ≤ ρ ≤ 500
1.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 90 90 90 100 100 150/170 150/225
1.1.2 (90) (90) (90) (100) (100) nvg nvg
1.1.3 α ≤ 1,6 90 90 90 90 90/125 150 150/200
1.1.4 (90) (90) (90) (90) (90/125) (150) (150/200)
1.2 mortar: general purpose, thin layer
4 < fb ≤ 8
500 ≤ ρ ≤1 000
1.2.1 α ≤ 1,0 90 90 90 100 100 125/240 150/240
1.2.2 (90) (90) (90) (100) (100) (100/200) (100/200)
1.2.3 α ≤ 0,6 90 90 90 100 100 125 150
1.2.4 (90) (90) (90) (100) (100) (125) (150)

N.B.5 Manufactured stone masonry

Manufactured stone units conforming to EN 771-5

Table N.B.5.1 Manufactured stone masonry minimum thickness of separating non-loadbearing separating walls (Criteria EI) for fire
resistance classifications
row number material properties:
gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]
Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification EI for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 60 90 120 180 240
1 Group 1 units
1.1 Mortar: general purpose, thin layer, lightweight
1 200 ≤ ρ 2 200
1.1.1   50 70/90 90 90/100 100 100/170
1.1.2 (50) (50/70) (70) (70/90) (90/100) (100/140)

Image

62
Image Table N.B.5.2 Manufactured stone masonry minimum thickness of separating loadbearing single-leaf walls (Criteria REI) for fire resistance classifications
row number material properties:
gross dry density ρ [kg/m3]
Minimum wall thickness (mm) tF for fire resistance classification REI for time (minutes) tfi,d
30 60 90 120 180 240
1 Group 1 units
1.1 Mortar: general purpose, thin layer, light weight
1 200 ≤ ρ ≤ 2 200
1.1.1 α ≤ 1,0 90/170 90/170 90/170 100/190 140/240 150/300
1.1.2 (90/140) 90/140 (90/140) (90/170) (100/190) (100/240)
1.1.3 α ≤ 0,6 70/140 70/140 90/170 90/170 100/190 140/240
1.1.4 (60/100) (70/100) (70/100) (70/140) (90/170) (100/190)

END OF NOTES Image

63

Annex C
Simplified calculation model

(Informative)

C.1 General

  1. In the simplified calculation method the loadbearing capacity is determined by boundary conditions on the residual cross section of the masonry for stated periods of fire exposure using the load at normal temperature.
  2. The simplified method is valid for masonry walls and columns under standard fire exposure built with the following units and mortar combinations:
    - clay units: group 1S and Group 1, unit strength fb 10- 40 N/mm2, gross Image dry Image density 1 000–2 000 kg/m3, general purpose mortar
    - calcium silicate units: group 1S and Group L, unit strength fb 10-40 N/mm2, gross Image dry Image density 1 500 - 2 000 kg/m3, thin layer mortar
    - dense aggregate concrete: group 1, unit strength fb 10-40 N/mm2, gross Image dry Image density 1 500 - 2 000 kg/m3, general purpose mortar
    - lightweight aggregate concrete: group 1S and Group 1, unit strength fb 4 - 8 N/mm2, gross Image dry Image density 600 – (pumice) 1000 kg/m3, lightweight mortar,
    - autoclaved aerated concrete: group 1, unit strength fb 2 - 6 N/mm2, gross Image dry Image density 400- 700 kg/m3, general purpose mortar, thin layer

    NOTE The limits given above relate to the results of the Simplified method having been calibrated against the results of tests. The list is not intended as a list of limits for other reasons. The principle of the method can be used if calibration results are available for units not covered by the list above.

  3. In simple calculation models the relationship between thermal elongation and masonry temperature may be considered to be constant. In this case the elongation may be determined from 3.3.3.1(1).

C.2 Procedure

  1. Determine the temperature profile of the cross-section, the structurally ineffective section and the residual cross-section, calculate the load-bearing capacity at the ultimate limit state with the residual cross-section (see figure C.1), check that this load-bearing capacity is greater than that required with the relevant load combination of actions (see (2) below).
  2. At the limit state for the fire situation, the design value of vertical load applied to a wall or column should be less than or equal to the design value of the vertical resistance of the wall or column such that:

    ImageNEdNRd,fiθ2 Image     (C1)

  3. The design value of the vertical resistance of the wall or column is given by: 64

    Image NRd,fiθ2 = Φ (f1 Aθ1 + f2 Aθ2) Image     (C2)

    where

    A total area of masonry
    Aθ1 area of masonry up to θ1;
    Aθ2 area of masonry between θ1 and θ2;
    θ1 temperature up to which the cold strength of masonry may be used;
    θ2 temperature above which the material has no residual strength
    NEd design value of the vertical load;
    NRd,fiθ2 design value of the resistance in fire
    f1 design compressive strength of masonry up to θ1;
    f2 design strength of masonry in compression between θ1 and θ1°C, taken as Cf1
    c constant obtained from stress strain tests at elevated temperature (with subscripts)
    Φ capacity reduction factor in the middle of the wall obtained from 6.1.2.2. of EN 1996-1-1, taking into account additionally the eccentricity eΔθ.
    eΔθ eccentricity due to variation of temperature across masonry.
  4. The temperature distribution across a masonry section and the temperature at which the masonry becomes ineffective, as a function of the time of fire exposure, should be obtained from the results of tests or from a data base of test results. In the absence of test results or a database the Figures C.3(a) to (d) may be used. For autoclaved aerated concrete masonry, reference should be made to prEN 12602. 65

Figure C.1 Illustration of areas of masonry at temperatures up to θ1, between θ1 and θ2, and structurally ineffective areas (over θ2)

Figure C.1 Illustration of areas of masonry at temperatures up to θ1, between θ1 and θ2, and structurally ineffective areas (over θ2)

The eccentricity, eΔθ, due to the fire load, for use in this simplified calculation method may be obtained from test results or from equation (C3a or b) (see also figure C.2):

Image

eΔθ = 0 when the fire is all around     (C3b)

where:

Image θ2 temperature above which the material has no residual strength in °C Image
hef effective height of the wall
αt coefficient of thermal expansion of masonry according to 3.7.4 of EN 1996-1 -1
Image tFr Image temperature assumed on the cold side
tFr thickness of the cross-section whose temperature does not exceed θ2
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Figure C.2 Vertical section on masonry

Figure C.2 Vertical section on masonry

NOTE: The value of ccl, ccs, cla, cda and caac to be used in a Country may be found in its National Annex

Values of constant, c, and temperature θ1 and θ2 by masonry material
Masonry units and mortar (surface unprotected) according to 1.1 (2) Values of constant c Temperature °C
θ2 θ1
Clay units with general purpose mortar ccl 600 100
Calcium silicate units with thin layer mortar ccs 500 100
Lightweight aggregate units (pumice) with general purpose mortar cla 400 100
Dense aggregate units with general purpose mortar cda 500 100
Autoclaved aerated units with thin layer mortar caac 700 200

END OF NOTE.

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Figure C.3(a): Clay masonry, gross dry Ac1 density 1 000 - 2000 kg/m3

Figure C.3(a): Clay masonry, gross Image dry Image density 1 000 – 2000 kg/m3

Figure C.3(b): Calcium silicate masonry, gross dry density 1 500 – 2 000 kg/m3

Figure C.3(b): Calcium silicate masonry, gross Image dry Image density 1 500 – 2 000 kg/m3

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Figure C.3(c): Lightweight aggregate concrete (pumice) masonry, gross dry density 600 - 1 000 kg/m 3

Figure C.3(c): Lightweight aggregate concrete (pumice) masonry, gross Image dry Image 600 - 1 000 kg/m3

Figure C.3(d): Dense aggregate concrete masonry, gross dry density 1 500 - 2 000 kg/m3

Figure C.3(d): Dense aggregate concrete masonry, gross Image dry Image density 1 500 - 2 000 kg/m3

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Figure C.3(e): Autoclaved aerated concrete masonry, gross dry density 400 kg/m3

Figure C.3(e): Autoclaved aerated concrete masonry, gross Image dry Image density 400 kg/m3

Figure C.3(f): Autoclaved aerated concrete masonry, gross dry density 500 kg/m3

Figure C.3(f): Autoclaved aerated concrete masonry, gross Image dry Image density 500 kg/m3

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Figure C.3(g): Autoclaved aerated concrete masonry, gross dry density 600 kg/m3

Figure C.3(g): Autoclaved aerated concrete masonry, gross Image dry Image density 600 kg/m3

key
tineff 30 is thickness of wall that has become ineffective in 30 minutes
tineff 90 is thickness of wall that has become ineffective in 90 minutes
θ2 is the temperature above which masonry is structurally ineffective
T Temperature (°C) t 30 30 minutes t 120 120 minutes
t Masonry thickness (mm) t 60 60 minutes t 150 150 minutes
3 Residual section with number in minutes t 90 90 minutes t 180 180 minutes
        t 240 240 minutes

Figure C.3 Temperature distribution across masonry section and temperature at which masonry is structurally ineffective

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Annex D
Advanced calculation method

(Informative)

D.1 General

  1. P Advanced calculation methods shall be based on fundamental physical behaviour leading to a reliable approximation of the expected behaviour of the structural component under fire conditions.
  2. Advanced calculation methods should include calculation models for the determination of:
  3. Advanced calculation methods may be used in association with any heating curve provided that the material properties are known for the relevant temperature range and the relevant rate of heating.

D.2 Thermal response

  1. Advanced calculation methods for thermal response should be based on the acknowledged principles and assumptions of the theory of heat transfer.
  2. The thermal response model should include consideration of:
  3. The influence of moisture content and of migration of the moisture within masonry may conservatively be neglected.
  4. The effect of non-uniform thermal exposure and of heat transfer to adjacent building components may be included where appropriate.

D.3 Mechanical response

  1. Advanced calculation methods for mechanical response should be based on the acknowledged principles and assumptions of the theory of structural mechanics, taking into account the changes of mechanical properties with temperature.
  2. The effects of thermally induced strains and stresses both due to temperature rise and due to temperature differentials, should be considered. The figures D.1 (a) to (d) and D.2(a) to (f)give relevant information. 72

    NOTE For autoclaved aerated concrete masonry, reference may be made to prEN 12602. For other materials reference can be made to other authorative publications.

  3. The deformation at ultimate limit state implied by the calculation methods should be limited as necessary to ensure that compatibility is maintained between all parts of the structure.
  4. Where relevant, the mechanical response of the model should also take account of geometrical non-linear effects.
  5. In the analysis of individual members or sub-assemblies the boundary conditions should be checked and detailed in order to avoid failure due to the loss of adequate support for the members.
  6. It should be verified that

    Efi,d(t) ≤ Rfi,t,d

    In which:

    Efi,d is the design effect of actions for the fire situation, determined in accordance with EN 1991-1-2, including effects of thermal expansions and deformations
    Rfi,t,d is the corresponding design resistance in the fire situation
    t is the designed duration of fire impact
  7. In the calculation of load-bearing structures, the way in which the structure collapses under fire impact, temperature-dependant material properties including stiffness as well as the effect of thermal strain and deformation (indirect fire impact) should be assessed.

Figure D.1(a): calculation values of temperature-dependant material properties of clay units with a density range of 900 - 1 200 kg/m3

Image Figure D.1(a): calculation values of temperature-dependant material properties of clay units with a density range of 900 – 1 200 kg/m3 Image

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Figure D.1(b): calculation values of temperature-dependant material-properties calcium silicate units with a density range of 1 600 - 2 000 kg/m3

Image Figure D.1(b): calculation values of temperature-dependant material-properties calcium silicate units with a density range of 1 600 – 2 000 kg/m3 Image

Figure D.1(c): calculation values of temperature-dependant material properties of lightweight aggregate concrete units (pumice) with a density range of 600 - 1 000kg/m3

Image Figure D.1(c): calculation values of temperature-dependant material properties of lightweight aggregate concrete units (pumice) with a density range of 600 – 1 000kg/m3

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Figure D.1(d): Calculation values of temperature-dependant material properties of autoclaved aerated concrete units with a density range of 400- 600 kg/m3

Figure D.1(d): Calculation values of temperature-dependant material properties of autoclaved aerated concrete units with a density range of 400 - 600 kg/m3 Image

Key
T(°C) temperature
Image λa thermal conductivity Image
ca specific heat capacity
ρ Image gross dry density Image kg/m3
1 Ratio of value at temperature T to that at 20°C

Figure D.1 Thermal analysis

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Figure D.2(a): Calculation values of thermal strain ev of clay units (group 1) with a normalised compressive strength range of 12 - 20 N/mm2 and with a gross dry density range of 900 -1200 kg/m3

Image Figure D.2(a): Calculation values of thermal strain εT of clay units (group 1) with a normalised compressive strength range of 12 – 20 N/mm2 and with a gross dry density range of 900 – 1200 kg/m3Image

Figure D.2(b): Calculation values of temperature-dependant stress-strain diagrams of clay units (group 1) with a normalised compressive strength range of 12 - 20 N/mm2 and with a gross dry density range of 900 - 1 200 kg/m3

Image Figure D.2(b): Calculation values of temperature-dependant stress-strain diagrams of clay units (group 1) with a normalised compressive strength range of 12 – 20 N/mm2 and with a gross dry density range of 900 – 1 200 kg/m3 Image

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Figure D.2(c): Calculation values of thermal strain St of calcium silicate units (solid) with a normalised compressive strength range of 12 - 20 N/mm2 and with a gross dry density range of 1 600 - 2 000 kg/m3

Image Figure D.2(c): Calculation values of thermal strain εT of calcium silicate units (solid) with a normalised compressive strength range of 12 – 20 N/mm2 and with a gross dry density range of 1 600 – 2 000 kg/m3 Image

Figure D.2(d): Calculation values of thermal stress- strain diagrams for calcium silicate units (solid) with a normalised compressive strength range of 12 - 20 N/mm2 and with a gross dry density range of 1 600 - 2 000 kg/m3

Image Figure D.2(d): Calculation values of thermal stress- strain diagrams for calcium silicate units (solid) with a normalised compressive strength range of 12 – 20 N/mm2 and with a gross dry density range of 1 600 – 2 000 kg/m3 Image

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Figure D.2(e): Calculation values of thermal strain 8t for lightweight aggregate concrete units (pumice) with a normalised compressive strength range 4-6 N/mm2 and with a gross dry density range of 600 - 1 000 kg/m3

Image Figure D.2(e): Calculation values of thermal strain εT for lightweight aggregate concrete units (pumice) with a normalised compressive strength range 4 – 6 N/mm2 and with a gross dry density range of 600 – 1 000 kg/m3 Image

Figure D.2(f): Calculation values of temperature-dependant stress-strain diagrams for lightweight aggregate concrete units (pumice) with a normalised compressive strength ratio of 4-6 N/mm2 and with a gross dry density range of 600 - 1 000 kg/m3

Image Figure D.2(f): Calculation values of temperature-dependant stress-strain diagrams for lightweight aggregate concrete units (pumice) with a normalised compressive strength ratio of 4 – 6 N/mm2 and with a gross dry density range of 600 – 1 000 kg/m3 Image

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Figure D.2(g): Calculation values of thermal strain of autoclaved aerated concrete units with a normalised compressive strength range of 4 - 6 N/mm2 and with a gross dry density range of 400 - 600 kg/m3

Image Figure D.2(g): Calculation values of thermal strain εT of autoclaved aerated concrete units with a normalised compressive strength range of 4 – 6 N/mm2 and with a gross dry density range of 400 – 600 kg/m3 Image

Figure D.2(h): Calculation values of temperature-dependant stress and strain of autoclaved aerated concrete units with a normalised compressive strength range of 4-6 N/mm2 and with a gross dry density range of 400 - 600 kg/m3

Image Figure D.2(h): Calculation values of temperature-dependant stress and strain of autoclaved aerated concrete units with a normalised compressive strength range of 4 – 6 N/mm2 and with a gross dry density range of 400 – 600 kg/m3 Image

Key
T(°C) temperature
1 Ratio of strength at temperature T to that at 20°C

Figure D.2 Mechanical Analysis

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Annex E
Examples of connections that meet the requirements of Section 5

(Informative)

Figure E.1: Cross-section of connections, wall to floor or roof, of non-loadbearing masonry walls

Image Figure E.1: Cross-section of connections, wall to floor or roof, of non-loadbearing masonry walls Image

Image

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Figure E.3: Connection wall to wall of loadbearing masonry walls

Figure E.3: Connection wall to wall of loadbearing masonry walls

Figure E.4: Movement connection of wall (column) to wall of concrete

Figure E.4: Movement connection of wall (column) to wall of concrete

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Figure E.5: Structural connections of fire walls to walls and floors

Figure E.5: Structural connections of fire walls to walls and floors

Figure E.6: Connection with no structural requirements

Image Figure E.6: Connection with no structural requirements Image

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Figure E.7: Connections of fire walls to steel structures

Figure E.7: Connections of fire walls to steel structures

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